Why Did Hitler Rise to Power in 1933?

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Why did Hitler rise to power in 1933?
When The First World War finally ended on November 11 1918; Germany was “crowned” the losers. It was a devious time and everyone was depressed which enabled some extremist’s parties to gain support from the citizens of Germany. One of parties was the Nazis with their leader Hitler. Hitler's rise to power cannot be attributed to one event, but a mixture of factors including events happening outside Germany, the strengths of the Nazi party, and the weaknesses of other parties within Germany. Hitler used these factors to his advantage and in 1933 he legitimately gained power to become chancellor. When the Germans heard about the Treaty of Versailles, they felt ‘pain and anger’. They felt it was unfair. They had not been allowed to take part in the talks – they had just been manipulated to sign. On 7 May, the victors presented their Treaty to the small German delegation.  Many Germans wanted to refuse to sign the treaty; some even suggested that they might start the war again. So it was with great difficulty that the President got the Reichstag to agree to sign the treaty. The Germans hated reparations; they said France and Britain were trying to starve their children to death.  At first they refused to pay, and only started paying after France and Britain invaded Germany. The Germans had a very small army.  They said they were helpless against other countries.  At first they refused to reduce the army, and the sailors sank the fleet, rather than hand it over. The Germans also lost a lot of territory.  Germany lost a tenth of its land - they claimed that the treaty was simply an attempt to destroy their economy.  Other nations were given self-determination – but the Treaty forced Germans to live in other countries.  Germans were also angry that they could not unite with the Austrian Germans. Weimar Germany had greeted with total horror the financial punishment of Versailles. If Germany had paid off the sum of £6,600,000,000, she...
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