When the Legends Die Comcon

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When the Legends die

Tom and Meo, characters of Hall Borland’s novel entitled “When the Legends Die,” are similar to each other because both of them are of have been competitive rodeo riders and both are from traditional backgrounds. The novel illustrates Tom being raised by his parents in the mountain according to the traditional Ute ways. However, when he becomes an orphan, Tom is led to leave the old way and adapt to new way of life. When Tom starts to get involved in Rodeo riding, Red Dillon introduces Tom to his cook, Meo. The first similarity between Tom and Meo is that they both are Rodeo riders in the book. While expressing to Red that he does not want to lose intentionally in rodeos anymore, Tom finds out that Meo also “was a hero once.” When Tom shows that he does not want to follow Red’s orders anymore, Red criticizes him saying that they are not in it for the hero business, but for money. Red telling Tom that Meo was a hero once suggests that Meo also was a Rodeo rider earlier in his life. The second similarity between Tom and Meo is that they were both from traditional backgrounds. While harvesting the beans, Meo says to Tom, “We know these things, you and I. Our people were not born last year. We are of the old people.” By saying “the old people,” Meo is not referring to their age but to the old traditions that they come from. While Tom is from the Ute culture, Meo comes from the Mexican tradition. Tom has been forced to learn the modern ways of life where everything is different. Everyone has been tricking him, first the Blue Elk and on to Red Dillon. Meo, who shares similarities with Tom, befriended Tom, as they understand each other's circumstances. The similarities between Tom and Meo that they are both rodeo riders at some point of their lives and that they come from traditional backgrounds allow them to connect and understand each other better.
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