When Everything Changes, Change Everything

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When Everything Changes- Change Everything?
How do you deal with change? Are you a change-agent or a mere resistance to change? Are you intimidated with the possibility, and have the pessimistic ‘what-if’ personality? Do you change the change itself by physical or clout power? Or are you strong and welcome the possibility of something new? How do you take change? How should you take change?

I guess I just flustered you with my mountain of enigmas. Sorry! I would still like you to answer those questions to yourself, so we both can really get involved with each other, during the progression of this topic- Change. Let me begin by introducing this little menace. My “unemotional” Oxford dictionary feels that change makes somebody/something different from what they used to be, or to stop having one state and start having another. I think it should be defined as the possibility that something new is coming and not as the misconception that “everything is over.”

How do you react to change? “Oh my God! I’m dead,” or “No! I’m ruined” or “S#!t! My life’s over,” or most probably “@$#@-_-@%.” Don’t blame yourself. That’s all instinctive. What you should change is the way you deal with the change itself. Don’t try to change the change, but change your response and see how positively the change unfolds. To further go into detail and explain my thoughts towards this, I would like to bring forward a poem by a wonderful poet, Ms. Em Claire Walsch- “The Longing.” This is where a person deals with a situation where something suddenly happens that changes a lot of things for him/her, mentally, physically, emotionally or worse- all of them together. This beautiful poem ‘The Longing’ is written by Em Claire, the prominent poet depicting various stages of life in her poetry. The theme of this poetry reflects to be that stage of life where someone looses one of his desired possessions and the aftermath of that event on that individual. The aftermath of that event simply depicts the infliction of that individual on oneself due to the deprivation of the previously mentioned possession. Let us generalize the situation and refer to ‘that individual’ as ‘human being,’ this is because the soul of Claire’s poetry generally refers to the similar nature of all human beings.

The Longing, by Em Claire Walsch:
Do not pretend that The Longing
Has not also lived in You,
Swinging, like a pendulum.
You have been lost,
And thieved like a criminal
Your heart into the darkness.
But life is tired, Deep Friend,
Of going on without You.
It is like the hand of the mother
Who has lost her child.
And if You are anything like me,
You have known your own courage.
There is room in this boat:
Take Your seat.
Take up Your paddle, and all of us
-All of Us-
Shall row our hearts

We will begin by first analyzing the misty heading of this beautiful poem, ‘The Longing.’ Lets invite our minds to look askance at this poignant yet ambiguous term, Longing, a strong feeling of wanting something or somebody. ‘The,’ before this term reflects it as being present as a fact, or something someone can easily identify with, like ‘The’ Eiffel Towers- ‘The’ Longing; therefore we would filter the meaning of the heading as being the prevalent utmost desire of something unavailable or lost within every human being. It is referred to as a common fact, an actuality, and a reality incontrovertible. Some people assert that they are complete, needing nothing more than what they are and what they have. These assertions might be bought by some, but seem almost unrealistic that how one individual is complete in his or her needs while there are millions of others lying unnoticed and almost ‘lost.’ If you go against this airy-fairy image of perfection, you wouldn’t be wrong. The poet herself nullifies their statements of mystical totality, “Do not pretend that the longing has not also lived in you,” she states that they mostly “pretend”...
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