Week 4 - Tutorial

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 743
  • Published : June 1, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Criminal Justice Ethics

Week’s 4 Tutorial

Doany Will

ETHC-232

Professor: Denise Young

Criminal Justice Ethics

In the general orders or in the personnel manual of virtually every police organization there is language about “ethics” and “integrity.” But what exactly does that mean? Ethics is an easy word to throw around and yet very hard to define. “Police officers are held to a higher standard than the general public, both on and off duty, but do we really understand why that is and how an organization can be confident that its employees always act with integrity? There are just a few thoughts for all law enforcement personnel to ponder, from the chief executive to the newest recruit.” (Sgt. Smith) This said, I have decided to report to my immediate supervisor and the District Attorney’s office, of my partner’s unethical actions in reference to the latest rape and attempt of murder case we are working on, since he did not act according to the department’s regulations and standards. As you all know, we have two suspects in link to this crime, they are both of the age of 14 and have previous criminal record. My partner proceeded to interrogate the two suspects by himself, without videotaping the interrogations and without their parents and lawyers present at that time, and I also believe he relied on using violence to make them sign their confessions; violating their rights and the ethics of duty (Deontology) which “Is the normative ethical position that judges the morality of an action based on the action's adherence to a rule or rules. It is sometimes described as "duty" or "obligation" or "rule" -based ethics, because rules "bind you to your duty" (Kant, 1755)

He also forgot some of the virtue ethics we have learned at school and at the Police Academy to “Always treat every human being, including yourself, as an end in himself and...
tracking img