Was the Weimar Republic Doomed from It’s Very Beginning?

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In 1918 the German people were shattered by the unexpected defeat in the first world war. As the war ended, the Kaiser abdicated and early in 1919 Germany’s politicians drew up there democratic constitution. Many saw it as doomed from the start with many problems facing it, with opposition from the left and the right.

Many believe that the Weimar republic was doomed, this is for a number of reasons. Firstly the government got left with the burden of the treaty of Versailles. The German people were extremely un-happy with the terms they were dealt. Germany experienced lots of territorial changes during this time, which included key industrial areas. In total Germany lost around 13% of its territory resulting to the loss of 12% of its population which lived in these areas (around 6.5 million) the treaty of Versailles left the government with a large debt from the war to pay off, thus causing the economy to be decreased. Through the loss of land, Germany lost lots of its natural resources and it also caused increased unemployment. The loss of the war created low moral and a death toll totalling 2 million and 6.3 million wounded which needed looking after. And the German people didn’t like the fact that Germany had to accept all blame for the war. For these the German people despised the new republic for accepting the terms.

Another reason why it could fail was due to the fact that it was seen as the German authoritarian tradition was gone, were the royal family would previously run the country. The German people saw this and did not like this new political structure were they moved from a dictatorship to a democracy.

This new democracy was headed by Friedrich Ebert, he was a saddler who rose to become one of the leaders of the “SPD” ,in November 1918 he became chancellor, and in February 1919 he was elected by the new assembly to be President of the Republic. Ebert steered the Weimar republic to safety, attempting to seek support from both workers...
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