Waiting to Exhale: Filipino Nationalism in the Age of Globalization

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At the end of the Cold War, a new phenomenon arose characterized by massive intensification of economic, political, social and cultural linkages across borders and continents. People call it many different names to the confusion of the common men and women. Some spoke of liberalization, while others started a discourse on internationalization-all these refer to rapid and large-scale changes in global trends that have significantly altered traditional views, standards and even practices. The good news is that somebody has finally coined a term to describe this phenomenon. The bad news is, up to this day, many still remain unable to understand it, much less cope with it. But whether we like it or not, the advent of globalization has come. Globalization, they say, has eroded many of the significant foundations of what were then popularly known as the nation-states. The term nation-state means a state whose inhabitants consider themselves to be a nation, geographically and legally bounded under one legitimate government; the population of which submits to a subjective perception of belonging to the same historical, linguistic, racial or any other common relationships. Over the last decades, many of these nation-states have experienced serious inability to cope with global problems that require global solutions. A case in point is terrorism where states are opting to ally with other states in the international community if only to respond to the terrorist threat within their own borders. Some states have even practically surrendered their sovereignty to those who have the right to melt away terrorism. Kenichi Ohmae, author of The End of the Nation State, also opines that the need for a nation-state has largely waned as the information age revolutionized business and international politics. His provocative thesis draws logic from the observation that the Cold War is over and that the financial flows around the world are no longer controlled by governments. Christopher...
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