Wage Gap in America

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Wage Gap in America
On a broader aspect, it says men and women are equal. Though at a bottom level, women are still struggling to occupy the same status as men in the outer world. Stratification between the two genders is seen everywhere including the household or the workplace. Even today, women still earns less as compared to men involved in the same profession. Like a male physician makes $140,000, while a female in the same profession makes $88,000. Statisticians at the US census bureau looked at almost 821 occupations. After adjusting for workers’ ages, education and work experience, they found a substantial gender gap in the earnings of the workers. Scholars at the Census Bureau studied several characteristics and after taking into consideration all of the factors like age, education, work experience, working hours per year, specialization etc. the wage gap between male and female reduced by only 3 cents. However, in real, women still earns 80 cents for every dollar earned by men. The issue of the “comparable worth” of jobs is being raised in complaints, grievances, public discussions, lawsuits, and legislative initiatives. Women who are nurses, librarians, government employees, and clerical workers have assessed their skills and the requirements of their jobs and have argued that their jobs are underpaid relative to jobs of comparable worth— that is, jobs requiring similar levels of skill, effort, and responsibility and similar working conditions— that are held mainly by men. For many women, the slogan “equal pay for work of equal value” has replaced the slogan “equal pay for equal work,” which is embodied in the Equal Pay Act of 1963. More generally, the issue raised is that of pay equity in a labor market that is highly segregated by sex. While the opportunity to move out of segregated job categories may be welcome to many women, many others, who have invested considerable time in training for their jobs, demand wage adjustment in “women's jobs” rather...
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