Villians and Outlaws

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  • Topic: Chicago Outfit, Al Capone, Bugs Moran
  • Pages : 4 (1576 words )
  • Download(s) : 102
  • Published : May 12, 2013
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Villains and Outlaws
Mac Millan, Macmillan Library Reference USA, 1998 - Law - 361 pages Bring history to life with this unique collection featuring vivid profiles of famous people, places and historical events. Articles are selected with the curriculum in mind, and include newly written and selected articles from the distinguished Macmillan Reference USA collection. Rewritten for students starting at the middle school level each volume features a lively two-color design, photographs, quotes and fascinating sidebars

Outlaws, Mobsters and Crooks: 
From the Old West to the Internet

Marie J Macnec,Cengage Gale, Nov 1, 2002 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 208 pages This book presents the lives of seventy-five North American criminals including the nature of their crimes, their motivations, and information relating to the law officers who challenged them.

Al Capone:
And the Roaring Twenties

David C. King, Blackbirch PressInc, Jun 1, 2001 - Juvenile Nonfiction The life of one of America's most infamous and powerful gansters set in 1920s Chicago during the Prohibition.

Born of an immigrant family in Brooklyn, New York in 1899, Al Capone quit school after the sixth grade and associated with a notorious street gang, becoming accepted as a member. Johnny Torrio was the street gang leader and among the other members was Lucky Luciano, who would later attain his own notoriety. About 1920, at Torrio’s invitation, Capone joined Torrio in Chicago where he had become an influential lieutenant in the Colosimo mob. The rackets spawned by enactment of the Prohibition Amendment, illegal brewing, distilling and distribution of beer and liquor, were viewed as “growth industries.” Torrio, abetted by Al Capone, intended to take full advantage of opportunities. The mob also developed interests in legitimate businesses in the cleaning and dyeing field and cultivated influence with receptive public officials, labor unions, and employees’ associations. Torrio soon succeeded...
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