Urban Innovations in Curitiba a Case Study

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URBAN INNOVATIONS IN CURITIBA: A CASE STUDY
Hanna-Ruth Gustafsson and Elizabeth Kelly Eugene & Carol Ludwig Center for Community and Economic Development

With support from the Streicker Fund for Student Research Yale Law School June 2012  


 

Hanna-Ruth Gustafsson: As a member of the Yale Law School class of 2012, Hanna served as a director of the YLS Community and Economic Development Clinic and an editor of the Yale Journal of International Law. Prior to attending law school, Hanna received a B.A. in History from Yale University and worked for the Urban Design Division of the New York City Department of Transportation. Starting in the fall, Hanna will be an associate at Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP in New York City. Elizabeth Kelly: A member of the Yale Law School class of 2012, Elizabeth graduated summa cum laude from Duke University and received her MSc in Comparative Social Policy from the University of Oxford as a Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial and Clarendon Scholar. At Yale, Elizabeth further developed her longstanding commitment to social and economic justice as a student director of the YLS Community and Economic Development Clinic and through internships at the White House Domestic Policy Council, HUD General Counsel's office, and Southeastern Louisiana Legal Services' Housing Law Unit. Beginning in September, Elizabeth will serve as Special Assistant to the Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and Research at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

The authors would like to express their gratitude to the Streicker Fund for Student Research at Yale Law School. The Fund’s generous financial support made this report possible.

The Eugene & Carol Ludwig Center for Community and Economic Development works at the intersection of law, policy, entrepreneurship, economics, and social innovation to research and design creative, testable, and scalable solutions to community development challenges at the local, national, and global levels. The viewpoints and opinions expressed in this paper are solely those of the authors and the Ludwig Center, and do not necessarily represent those of the Ludwig family.

Copyright © 2012 Eugene and Carol Ludwig Center for Community & Economic Development.

 

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Table of Contents

I. II. III.

Introduction…………………………………………………………………....4 Urban Growth in Curitiba…………………………………………………….. 6 Curitiba’s Urban Planning Innovations………………………………………. 9 A. Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)………………………………………………... 10 i. Bus Routes and Zoning..………………………………………… 11 ii. Transfer Terminals and Bus Stops………………………………. 13 iii. Fares and Fare Collection……………………………………….. 14 iv. Financing and Operations……………………………………….. 15 v. BRT Usage……………………………………………………….16 B. Parks System…………………..…………………………………………17 C. Recycling Program……………………………………………………….19

IV.

Applicable Lessons………………………………………………………….. 21 A. Develop a BRT System…………………………………………………..22 B. Integrate Land Use, Transportation, and Environmental Planning………24 C. Strategically Designate Park Land……………………………………….24 D. Implement Comprehensive Recycling Programs………………………...25

V.

Conclusion…………………………………………………………………... 26

 

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  I. Introduction Across the globe, urban growth is occurring at an unprecedented rate and scale.1 In 2008, the percentage of the world population residing in cities reached 50 percent. By 2050, an estimated 70 percent of the global population will live in urban centers.2 Much of this growth is concentrated in “mega cities,” metropolises of over 10 million people.3 These mega cities are increasingly merging to form “mega regions,” defined as regional centers of interlinked economic and urban growth and often home to as many as 100 million people.4 Mega regions’ economic and cultural benefits are well documented.5 The world’ s forty-largest mega regions cover only a fraction of the earth’s surface and contain just 18 percent of...
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