Unemployment

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Management Science Letters 2 (2012) 2753–2756

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Management Science Letters
homepage: www.GrowingScience.com/msl

A social work study to measure the effect of unemployment

Faezeh Taghipoura, Gholamreza Tajbakhshb, Allahyar Arabmomenic and Mohammad Reza Iravanid*

a

Assistant Professor, Department of Cultural Management Khorasgan (Isfahan) Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan, Iran Assistant Professor of Sociology Grand Ayatollah Boroujerd, Iran Department of Human Science of Islamic Azad University Khomeinishahr Branch, Isfahan, Iran d

Assistant Professor , Department of Social Work, Islamic Azad University of Khomeinishahr, Khomeinishahr Branch, Daneshjou Blvd, Iran b
c

ARTICLEINFO
Article history:
Received March 25, 2012
Received in revised format
25 September 2012
Accepted 4 October 2012
Available online
October 7 2012
Keywords:
Unemployment
Drug addiction
Rubbery

ABSTRACT
Unemployment is believed as one of most important issues in today's economy around the world. The recent economic turmoil in European countries, for instance, has created some troubles such as increase in rate of depression, divorce, etc. In this paper, we present a social study work in one of regions of Iran. The proposed study of this paper designs and distributes a questionnaire among 80 experts who live in the region and tries to understand whether there is a correlation between unemployment and rubbery, immigration, drug addiction and non-value jobs. The survey uses Pearson correlation to test four hypotheses and the results indicate that although there is no strong correlation between unemployment and rubbery and immigration but there is a strong evidence to believe that unemployment can increase drug addiction and non-value added jobs.

© 2012 Growing Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

1. Introduction
These days, there is growing concerns among different North American, European and other countries about the consequences of the effects of unemployment in their societies. In fact, when people lose their jobs, they may face many challenges such as family conflict, drug addiction, unwanted immigration, etc. During the past few years, there have been interest in learning more about the effect of unemployment on different social factors. Congregado et al. (2011) explained that Spain has been destroying more jobs than any other European country in recent years and in 2012 the rate reached to about 24%. The exponential growth of the Spanish unemployment rate was the by-product of falling employment rates.

Lundin et al. (2012) discussed on various studies on a higher risk of suicide among the unemployed, where some individuals may be more prone to both unemployment and suicide because of healthrelated factor. In such case, suicide among the unemployed could be a consequence of health-related * Corresponding author. Tel: +989130758065

E-mail addresses: iravani@iaukhsh.ac.ir (M.R. Iravani)

© 2012 Growing Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
doi: 10.5267/j.msl.2012.10.013

 
 
 

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selection. Lundin et al. (2012) investigated the relationship between unemployment and suicide, and the importance of other sickness absence to this relationship. According to their survey, higher levels of sickness absence were associated with an increased risk of subsequent unemployment. The higher prevalence of sickness absence among the unemployed attenuated the relationship between unemployment and suicide in both women and men.

Noh (2009) performed an investigation on whether the relationship between unemployment rates and suicide rates vary based on the level of real per capita gross domestic product (GDP). They used the cross-country panel fixed influences model to exclude cross-sectional variations but exploit timeseries ones. They reported that higher income was related to higher suicide rates. In other words, their results showed that the implied impact of unemployment...
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