Two Week Discuss

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  • Topic: OECD, Books, International Standard Book Number
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  • Published : March 10, 2013
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SECOND EDITION

INTRODUCTION

“ I notice that you use plain, simple language, short words and brief sentences. That is the way to write English –
it is the modern way and the best way. Stick to it;
don’t let fluff and flowers and verbosity creep in…”
— Mark Twain

INTRODUCTION

THE KEYS TO GOOD WRITING

are accessibility and consistency, enabling the reader to concentrate on the meaning of the text. A consistent style is particularly important for an organisation with an international readership as it helps build an easily recognisable corporate image.

The OECD Style Guide highlights the standards and conventions that should be used for all OECD publications. It serves as a useful reference tool to writing. But whatever your style, just be consistent. CHAPTER I: WRITING FOR THE OECD and CHAPTER 2: PRINCIPLES OF STYLE provide information on topics such as how to write well, the structure of an OECD publication and the grammatical rules that apply. CHAPTER 3: RULES AND CONVENTIONS (formerly published on line as Technical Guidelines) aims to answer those questions relating to the technical aspects of language use in an A-Z format.

CHAPTER 4: WATCHING OUT FOR PITFALLS IN ENGLISH highlights
language definitions and nuances. Supplementary information
offering advice on how to choose a title, write an executive summary, number OECD publications and correct proofs can be found
in ANNEXES A-D.
The OECD Style Guide is also available on line.
We would like to thank all the people who have contributed
to this revision, including the many assistants, authors and communications co-ordinators who have regularly sent us helpful comments and questions. Their feedback is the basis for the
evolution of this Style Guide.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Members of the PAC Publishing
team will be happy to discuss your
project with you and respond to
any specific questions you may have.
You can also contact the
Communications Co-ordinator of
your directorate, who will be able to
advise you on the best procedures.
Please send questions or
suggestions for improvements to
the OECD Style Guide to Outlook
account, PAC STYLE GUIDE.

Dictionaries
and References

1. WRITING FOR THE OECD
Writing to be read
OECD readership
OECD publishing policy
Standard OECD
publication structure
The editorial process
Formats and technical constraints

2. PRINCIPLES OF STYLE
Choosing the right words
Keeping it short and simple
Organising your content
Final checklist

3. RULES AND CONVENTIONS
Abbreviations
Types of abbreviation
Units of measure
Other common abbreviations
Bibliographies, references
and sources
Citation of a complete work
Citation of part of a work
Citation of a journal or periodical
Citation of one of a series
Citation of unpublished material
References in a language other
than English or French
Internet references
Sources of graphs and tables
Breaks in sentences and words
Use of spaces between words
Division of words
Capitalisation
Use capitals
Do not use capitals

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Country names, codes
and currencies
The euro
Non-member economies
ISO codes for
OECD member countries
Euro area former currencies
ISO codes for
non-member economies
Dates and time
Dates
Ages, centuries
Seasons
Time
Electronic addresses
Equations
Footnotes and endnotes
Notes in tables, boxes and figures
Foreign words and expressions
Gender sensitive language
Gender pronouns
Gender in job titles
Geographic and
economic groupings
Hyphenation
Adverbs and adjectives
Repeated letters
Capital letters in compound words
OECD titles
Dangling hyphens
Doubled hyphens
Non-breaking hyphens
Indexes
Types of index
Presentation of an index
International organisations
Italic and roman type

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