Triple Jump Phase

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Montrail Brooks
Dr.Livingston
AES 364
Muscular Analysis

Introduction
Block starts was create first created to help the grounds keeper take better care of the running surface with was made of clay or cinder. Starting blocks has came a long way from being a single holes dug in the ground to the high tech, lightweight, but yet expensive running aid their now. To properly observe and describe the breakdown of the hop, skip, and jump phases, while determining the muscles that cause these movements.

The triple jump, referred to as the hop, skip and jump, is a track and field event similar to the long jump. The only difference between the two is that the hop, skip, and jump involve a hop and a step, whereas the long jump involves just a jump. In the first phase of the triple jump, the competitor builds momentum by sprinting down the runway, planting their lead foot at the marked board, and “hops” into the air, cycling one leg around into phase two. After completing the cycle, the lead foot strikes the ground again initiating the “skip”, where the opposite leg is brought up and the body goes into the bounding position. Finally as the body is coming out of the bounding position, the opposite leg hits the ground in order to propel or “jump” the body forwards, aiming for distance rather than height, into the pit. [pic]

The phases

In the triple jump, there are three joints that aid in movement of the hip, the knee, and the ankle. Together the three joints allow optimum distance and proper stability for the jumper. The hip, which holds the femur and pelvis, allows the jumper to extend as his foot strikes the board. While keeping the knee in flexion, he pushes off into the cycling pattern. In the skip phase, the hip will remain in a flexed position as the trail leg goes into extension. When in the jump phase, the hip allows the leg to go from an extended position, to a partial flexed position.

The knee, which hold the fibula, tibia,...
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