Trends in Nursing Leadership

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The Future of Nursing
Grand Canyon University: NRS-440V Trends and Issues in Health Care September 3, 2012

Introduction

This paper will discuss the future of nursing and its relation to the future of health care in the United States. This writer will discuss the Institute of Medicines’ (IOM) report “Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health”, that was published in 2010. This paper will identify the importance of this report to the nursing workforce, and will outline the importance and intent of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action. Finally this paper will indentify the rational for state-based action coalitions and discuss two ongoing initiatives in the state of California. It is the intent of this writer to show how through these programs the nursing profession can and will play a huge role in reforming this countries health care system. IOM “Future of Nursing” Report

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) performed a two year study to address the need to transform the profession of nursing. The study was completed in 2010. This report laid out four key areas that will help nursing play a vital role in the health care reform. They include statements that include the fact that nurses should be able to perfume their duties to the extent of their training, all nurses should The four key statements are: 1. Nurses should perform the duties within the extent of their education and training. 2. Encourage nurses to get higher levels of education and training through a more streamlined education system. 3. Nurses should partner, with physicians and other professionals, to redesign health care in the U.S. 4. Improve data collection and information infrastructure by means of effective workforce planning and policies. Through these four key ideas lay the foundation of the recommendations of the Campaign for Action report (thefutureof nursing, 2010). How the IMO “Future of Nursing” Report Impacts Nursing Workforce One of the recommendations from the IOM (2010), report is that nursing needs to double the number of nurses with a doctorate by 2020. This is a vital part of nursing change, because of the extreme nursing shortage the United States is currently facing .According to Huber (2009), there was an increase or 7.4% in nursing graduates during the 2006 school year. And a recent report by AACN in 2008-2009 schools had to turn down over 49,000 applicants from their baccalaureate and graduate nursing school in due to not having enough faculty. To increase the number of nursing graduates it is obvious that nursing needs more instructors. To help make this happen the IOM suggests that associations such as the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission should make sure nursing schools are encouraging at least ten percent of all BSN graduates move into a master’s or doctoral degree program in the five years following graduation. They go onto say that universities need to create more inviting benefit and salary packages to entice more nurses into the education field (AACN, 2009). Another recommendation that will affect nursing workforce is to remove scope-of-practice barriers. As of now ARNP’s work under individual state laws and guidelines instead of performing their duties according to their education and training. In the opinion of this writer as restrictions on ARNP’s decrease the amount of nurses wanting to transition into practitioners will increase. The IOM report recommends the implementation of nurse residency programs as well. These residency programs will help newly graduated nurses transition into the profession more comfortably and more competently which will help lower turnover rates of new nurses (thefutureof nursing, 2010). Campaign for Action’s Overall Intent

On the website, thefutureofnursing.org it says that the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action...
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