To Kill a Mockingbird: the Theme of Prejudice

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 1038
  • Published : October 8, 1999
Open Document
Text Preview
To Kill A Mockingbird: The Theme of Prejudice

The theme of prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird is much more than just a case of black and white. The entire novel is about prejudice in it's many forms, the most prominent case of prejudice is the racism and hate between the blacks and whites. The whole town of Maycomb is based on stereotypes of it's inhabitants, that are passed down from generation to generation. Rumors run rampid and very little truth is usually in them.

"So Jem received most of his information from Miss Stephanie Crawford, a neighbor scold, she said she knew the whole thing. According to Miss Stephanie, Boo was sitting in the livingroom cutting some items from The Maycomb Tribune to paste in his scrapbook. His father entered the room. As Mr.Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent's leg, pulled them out, wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities." (Chapter 1, page 11)

I don't see how you can't expect to have prejudice in a small town like that, after all isolation is a major factor in why prejudice and racism arise.

"Men hate each other because they fear each other, and they fear each other because
they don't know each other,
and they don't know each other because
they are often separated from each other. " -Martin Luther King

The stereotypes in this novel are fairly common but the fact that they are accepted and used so openly in public is what astonishes me. I think people in the community, even if they do disagree with what is being said or done, they will say or do nothing because they are afraid of going against the majority of the community and become a victim of prejudice themselves. Atticus was one of the few who actually stopped and listened to himself without being biased by the views and opinions of the...
tracking img