Thesis

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Thesis Statement: The Homestead Act is one of the most important act passed by the Congress for the benefit of American People. Source # 1: http://www.ehow.com/facts_5978437_significance-homestead-act.html “The Homestead Act was significant for settlers and those brave enough to start a new life, because it offered them 160 acres of public land, for free or little charge. But ownership of the land was only granted if the land was developed for farming.” This means that the Homestead Act was very important to settlers, even slaves, to start a new life. Source # 2: http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/homestead-act/ “Daniel Freeman, a union Army scout, was scheduled to leave Gage County, Nebraska Territory, to report for duty in St. Louis. At a New Year’s party, the night before, Freeman met some Land Office officials and convinced them to open the office shortly after midnight. Freeman became one of the first to take advantage of the opportunities provided by the Homestead Act. President Abraham Lincoln signed the Homestead Act on May 20, 1862.” This means that Daniel Freeman and others were able to sign and fill-out an application for the Homestead Act. Source # 3: http://www.grit.com/community/history/homestead-act-of-1862.aspx “Most of the 33 million school children in this country today had never stepped foot on a farm. In fact, only 2 of every 100 Americans now live on a farm, and less that 1% of 300 million people in our country claim farming as their occupation. But many of us can trace our heritage to parents, grandparents, or even great grandparents who spent their lives on a farm. About 93 million Americans living today are descendants of homesteaders who filed claims under the Homestead National Monument of America, located near Beatrice, Nebraska. My wife and I are among them. My maternal grandfather left his boyhood home near Springfield, Illinois, in the early 1900’s to homestead 160 acres of prairie in western Nebraska. My wife’s great-...
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