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TROOP LEADING PROCEDURES (TLP)

TROOP LEADING PROCEDURE is the logical sequence of action that a leader follows while preparing for the execution of an assigned mission making the best use of time, facilities or equipment and personnel.

Troop-leading procedure is a dynamic process by which a commander receives a mission, plans and executes it. It should be an instinctive and familiar way of thinking for a commander. The sequence of the individual TLP’s is not rigid. It is modified to meet the mission, situation and available time. Some steps are done concurrently while others may go on continuously throughout the operation. TLP is time saver and as such, the leader conducts them in the order that most effectively uses the available time.

PURPOSES OF TLP

1.It ensures that the leader makes the best use of time, equipment and personnel, in accomplishing the assigned mission. 2. Allows the commander/leader to launch his troops in the battle quickly with maximum preparation. 3. It assures the accomplishment of all actions required before battle. 4.To save time.

STEPS OF TROOP LEADING PROCEDURE

STEP 1. RECEIVE THE MISSION

A mission may be received either in a written or oral form; warning order, operation (OPORD), or fragmentary order (FRAGO). At times, a leader may deduce a change in mission based on a change in the situation. a.Once an upcoming mission is identified, actions to begin preparing the unit are conducted. The CO conducts an initial METT-T analysis to determine the requirements for his warning order.

b. With the information available, the commander sets his time schedule by identifying the actions that must be done (time-critical tasks) to prepare his unit for the operation. These preparatory actions are identified by a preliminary consideration of the information on the mission, enemy, terrain, and own troops. An initial reconnaissance is conducted to allow the leader to more fully understand the time requirements for the mission. He then develops his time schedule by starting at “mission time” and working backward to the time it is now (reverse planning). The mission time is normally the most critical time in the operation. c.The commander must ensure that all subordinate echelons have sufficient time for their own planning needs. A general rule of thumb for leaders at all levels is to use no more than one-third of the available time for planning and issuance of the OPORD. This will leave the rest of the available time for the subordinate leaders to use for the planning and preparation.

STEP 2. ISSUE A WARNING ORDER

Do not wait for more information. Issue the best warning order possible with the information at hand and update it as needed with additional warning orders. The warning order allows units prepare for combat as soon as possible after being alerted of an upcoming mission. This normally involves a number of standard actions that should be addressed by SOP that must be done to prepare for the mission. The specific contents for each warning order will vary, based upon the unique tactical situation.

STEP 3. MAKE A TENTATIVE PLAN

Tentative plans are the basis for the Operation Order (OPORD). The leader uses the commander’s estimate of the situation to analyze METT-Information, develop and analyze a course of action (COA), compares COA and make decision that produces a tentative plan.

The company commander makes a tentative plan based on the following:

M- Mission
E- Enemy
T- Terrain and weather
T- Troops
T- Time

What is the company MISSION? What are the stated and implied tasks?

What is the ENEMY situation? What weapons and units do they have in support? Will they mounted, dismounted, or both?

SEQUENCE IN STUDYING ENEMY SITUATION

S- SizeS...
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