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Factors of the Number of Transferees in the High School Department of Mindanao Christian Foundation College and Seminary

Chapter 1
THE PROBLEM AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE
Introduction

The word ‘transfer’ refers in moving from one school to another and the word ‘transition’ to refer to the move from one year to another within a school. Much moreattention has been given to cross-institutional transfer than to within-school transitionexperiences. However, teachers, policy makers and researchers are increasingly aware ofthe importance of giving greater priority to transitions if pupils are to sustain theircommitment to learning at difficult moments in their school careers. When transferring into schools, students complete a "Choice of Schools Request Form," indicating basic demographic data and reasons for the transfer request. Comments from those who talk to transferees, however, raise questions as to the veracity of the information on the forms. Secondary school transfer applicants and their parents were surveyed to identify reasons for transferring. Both students and parents learned about different schools mainly from friends and family. Students transferred to schools to be with friends, satisfy their parents, get a "fresh start," enter particular programs, or attend schools with higher academic standards. Students transferred away because they were moving, disliked the school or classmates, or were expelled. Transferring to a school because the "discipline was more strict" was a reason given frequently by parents, but never given by student. One excellent reason to transfer is because you are unhappy. You don't have to settle for four years of misery. With such a wide variety of schools available, you are bound to find one that will meet your academic and social expectations.

Another reason to transfer is if your current school does not have a strong program in your area of interest. Some students who are rejected from their first-choice school attend another school with the intention of transferring However, if your goal is simply to enroll in a high school with a bigger name, you might want to reconsider. The difference in recognition between your old school and your new one may not justify the hassle of transferring.

Theoretical framework

Some students decide that, despite their initial enthusiasm for a Christian school, things are not working out. Transferring to another school is something these individuals may wish to consider, but they must understand that doing so could affect the amount of financialaid they are entitled to. If men and women hope to apply for a scholarship and universities they hope to attend, they may find that their prospective school offers less funding in scholarships for transfer students. Individuals who are relying on these sources of financial aid may want to consider discussing their plans with an admissions adviser at their schools before making any decisions. Student transfers from school to school at the secondary levels have been increasing for many decades. A proposed typology of major school transfer flows distinguishes between "systemic" transfers, caused by changes in school structures, and "individualistic" transfers, caused by family or individual changes. Within this typology, transfers can be further analyzed by their origins, timing in the school year, severity of student or community responses, and the nature of school programs for new students. Current theories on transfers, drawn from the fields of social organization and social and individual psychology, fail to address the full array of conditions affecting school transfers. Similarly, a review of research literature on student responses to transfers, and on the effects of transfers on students of different ages, reveals an absolute lack of research as well as design deficiencies and inconsistent results in the existing research. Moreover, little information has been gathered on school practices for...
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