The Woman Behind the Character of Daisy Buchanan

Topics: F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ginevra King, The Great Gatsby Pages: 2 (797 words) Published: April 3, 2013
The woman behind the character of Daisy Buchanan

Lives stories were always an option for writers. It represented the mean to embody their experiences and their bellowed, as in the case of F. Scott Fitzgerald. The author added a personal touch with each work, with his bellowed, Ginevra King. She was the woman behind his characters as in Judy Jones in "Winter Dreams" ;in Isabelle Borge in This Side of Paradise; most notably, Daisy Buchanan in The Great Gatsby . Fitzgerald also recreated their meeting in "Babes in the Woods," from the collection Bernice Bobs Her Hair and Other Stories; this was reused in This Side of Paradise. King is also featured in the books The Perfect Hour by James L.W. West III and in a fictionalized form in Gatsby's Girl by Caroline Preston. The musical The Pursuit of Persephone tells the story of King's romance with Fitzgerald. The romantic relationship between Daisy and Gatsby is a re-writing of the love story between Fitzgerald and Ginevra King. She was born in Chicago and her father was a wealthy Chicago businessman and financier, the story presented by Fitzgerald brings the moment when the readers find out about the history of their relationship between Gatsby and Daisy. We find that Daisy was an up-town girl and Gatsby was a down-town boy. Ginevra first met Fitzgerald on January 4, 1915, while visiting her roommate from Westover, Marie Hersey, in St. Paul, Minnesota. They met at a sledding party and, according to letters and diary entries, they both became infatuated. They sent letters back and forth for months, and their passionate romance continued until January 1917. In August 1916, Fitzgerald first wrote down the words, thought to have been said to him by Charles King, that would later recur in the movie adaptation of The Great Gatsby: "Poor boys shouldn't think of marrying rich girls. The line represents the substance of their relationship in real life and the real state of their relation. In...
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