The Visitor

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  • Topic: IB Diploma Programme, Gibbons Ruark
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ENGLISH A1 - STANDARD LEVEL - PAPER 1 ANGLAIS AI - N IV E A U M O YEN - EPREUVE 1 INGLES A1 - NIVEL MEDIO - PRUEBA 1 Friday 11 November 2005 (afternoon) Vendredi 11 novembre 2005 (apres-midi) Viernes 11 de noviembre de 2005 (tarde) 1 hour 30 minutes / 1 heure 30 minutes / 1 hora 30 minutos

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES Do not open this examination paper until instructed to do so. Write a commentary on one passage only. It is not compulsory for you to respond directly to the guiding questions provided. However, you may use them if you wish.

N'ouvrez pas cette epreuve avant d'y Etre autorisi(e). Redigez un commentaire sur un seul des passages. Le commentaire ne doit pas necessairement repondre aux questions d'orientation fournies. Vous pouvez toutefois les utiliser si vous le desirez. INSTRUCCIONES PARA LOS ALUMNOS No abra esta prueba hasta que se lo autoricen. Escriba un comentario sobre un solo fragmento. No es obligatorio responder directamente a las preguntas que se ofrecen a mod0 de guia. Sin embargo, puede usarlas si lo desea.



Write a commentary on one passage only. It is not compulsory for you to respond directly to the guiding questions provided. However, you are encouraged to use them as starting points for your commentary. 1. (a) Joseph and his father are standing in a health clinic near a market when a group of men carrying sticks attack a Muslim bread seller. The bread seller has a long beard, a shaved top lip, and a white skullcap. There are twenty or thirty young men in the group and they shout obscenities at the man, who stands with his bicycle. The old man shouts at the group, both hands in the air. People in the market stop talking and move away. His father says, “This is ridiculous,” and looks out through the window. Joseph asks his father what the old man is saying. “I know you. I sell you bread,” his father translates. “I know you. I am nothing to you. I sell bread to you.” His father is visibly distressed. He walks away from the window and paces the floor. The men push the bread seller to the ground and begin beating him on the back with their sticks. His father moves toward the window again and says, “I’m going out there. Let me deal with it.” “You can’t do that,” Joseph says and grabs him by the arm. His father is shaking. Through the window the bread seller is lying in a cloud of dust, still shouting at the men with sticks. “You’re right,” his father says. “It wouldn’t do any good. This is the problem. It would do no good. It makes me wonder what the hell I’m doing here.” Joseph feels his father’s arm in his hand. It is thin and hard. He realizes that it is the first time he has held on to his father in a long time. They are standing in the middle of the health clinic. A group of pregnant women waiting to be seen are sitting on benches. Two of them have moved to the window and are watching the street outside. “Incredible,” his father says so loudly that the women look up at him. “Incredible that I am standing here with my son.” He turns awkwardly towards Joseph and grasps him by both shoulders, as if preparing to push him to the ground. It is only at the last moment that Joseph realizes that his father is hugging him, pulling him into a gangly embrace. He is held there, pressed into the bony rib cage, enveloped by smells of camphor and curry, and is so surprised that the kiss, when it comes, is as inexplicable as a moth, a soft winged creature, striking his cheek on a dark night. They walk quickly down the nearest alley. His father puts his head down and walks with his hands in his pockets. A few minutes later, they stop in front of a butcher’s shop with a white tiled counter open to the street. The fresh carcass of a goat hangs from a hook at the front and two men in aprons are using large steel knives to cut slabs of meat...
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