The Unknown Citizen

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The Unknown Citizen Is Me

"The Unknown Citizen", a poem written by W.H. Auden, reflects a period of vast change in America's history, making "The Unknown Citizen" an example of the government's view of the perfect modern man in an overrated, unrealistic society.

During the time period that this poem was written, in the late 1930's, The United States was going through tremendous social, political and economic change. Following the passing of Black Monday and at the onset of The Great Depression, many Americans held negative opinions of their government and the many positive aspects that once drew citizens to the United States were becoming increasingly negative. The Great Depression fundamentally changed the relationship between the government and it's people. Citizens began to expect and accept a larger federal role in their lives and the economy. During this time period, Americans were issued cards with a personalized federal numbers, better known as Social Security cards, which in turn depersonalized the political system of the United States.

We the people, see our government as a coalition between our leaders and ourselves, leaders that we elect to represent and enforce our values. They merely see us a number. This issue emerges currently with regard to the election of the next president of the United States. The entire issue deals not with the citizens' wants and needs, but with the "numbers". We are no longer individuals, but merely a vast pool of insignificant numbers. Numbers that only become imperative when the disparity between them is diminutive. "Was he free? Was he happy? The question is absurd: Had anything been wrong we should certainly have heard (Auden)." This question is still being asked today, the only difference now is that there is no doubt whether or not the opinions of the masses are being heard. The question remaining is whether or not the government is actually listening to the...
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