“the Swing” Analysis

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Rococo, The Swing
  • Pages : 3 (1045 words )
  • Download(s) : 582
  • Published : April 26, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
“The Swing” Analysis
Presentation

Date of Creation: 1767
Alternative Names: L'escarpolette
Height (cm): 81.00 Length (cm): 64.20
Medium: Oil
Support: Canvas
Subject: Scenery
Created by: Jean-Honoré Fragonard
Current Location: London, United Kingdom
Displayed at: Wallace Collection
Owner: Wallace Collection
Basic Information

The image or painting I chose to analyze is called “The Swing” by Jean-Honoré Fragonard and it was completed in London 1767. This particular piece I would consider being a “Scenery” type or a Rococo style and was done using oil paint on a canvas. It is currently being displayed within the “Wallace Collection” at London, the piece its self is of a young man hidden in the bushes, watching a woman on a swing, being pushed by her elderly husband, almost hidden in the shadows, and unaware of the lover. As the lady goes high on the swing, she lets the young man take a furtive peep under her dress; all while flicking her own shoe off in the direction of a Cupid and turning her back to two angelic cherubim on the side of her husband.

The Swing Analysis

Elements
Within this painting I find that there are four important line elements that help lead the viewer’s eyes to the three main subjects. The first two lines that are prominent within this painting is of the swing’s support ropes, they seem to form a triangle shape that seems to point to the hidden young man reaching out for the swinging girl. Clearly the artist wanted their viewers to understand that this individual was important to the main theme of the painting and he made a great choice in doing so because these two lines or ropes help reinforce the desired effect. The next two lines are attached to the support ropes of the swing and are being held by another subject that plays an important role of the main theme. These two ropes or lines form another triangle that points directly to the older husband, who is clearly an important subject within this painting and with...
tracking img