The Scientific Revolution

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During the 17th and 18th centuries, women were often seen as the inferior of the two sexes. They were expected to be educated only in how to take care of the house, how to cook, how to raise a child, and other common jobs that were thought to be suitable for a woman. However, as the Scientific Revolution occurred, more and more women began to take interest in studying other things such as chemistry, astronomy, and medicine. The attitudes and reactions towards the participation of women in these fields of study during the 17th and 18th centuries were both positive and negative; some people were completely against it, some men supported it, and some women supported their sex by proving themselves in their respective fields of study; but, the road to acceptance for women was not one without struggles, sacrificing countless days and their health for the all the sake of science.

Men were primarily the opposition against women actively participating in scientific research but were not exclusively against it, some women also shared these feelings. Up until the Scientific Revolution, men were almost always seen as the dominant force in society opposed to women. when women began to apply to universities and contribute to science in the 17th and 18th century, it came as a shock to many. For example, Johann Junker, head of the University of Halle, questioned the legality of a woman attending a university or earning a doctorate probably because of his sexist views that were common in his time. Women who did participate in scientific discussions were often met with discrimination and inequality. Samuel Pepys, an English diarist, said that when the Duchess of Newcastle was invited to a meeting of the Royal Society of Scientists, she dressed so antiquely and her behavior was so ordinary that he did not like her at all, and she did not say anything worth hearing. Also, Johann Theodor Jablonski, secretary to the Berlin Academy of Sciences, said in a letter to the Academy that...
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