The Role of the Soliloquies in Hamlet

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The role of the soliloquies in Hamlet
Hamlet's soliloquies reveal a lot about his character. They focus mostly on his indecisiveness and his desire to do what is right. His soliloquies help to further develop his character and we gain a better understanding of hamlets mindset throughout the play. Hamlet constantly insults himself for not doing what he believes is right and he constantly has to reassure himself that his actions do what he is trying to accomplish. Hamlets first soliloquy in act one scene is meant to tell the audience why he is depressed in the previous scene. Hamlet says, “How weary, stale, flat and unprofitable, Seem to me all the uses of this world!" This line helps to show Hamlets depression. He thinks that the world no longer has any meaning and there is nothing to gain from life. In his soliloquy Hamlet is both upset about his father’s death and shocked that Gertrude only mourned for Hamlets father for a month. Although Hamlet doesn’t agree with his mother’s relationship he wants to stay out of it and keep his mouth shut, “But break, my heart; for I must hold my tongue." Hamlet’s depression could also be fed by his inability to reveal his true feelings about his mother’s relationship openly. He has conflicting emotions because he doesn’t want to speak up about the relationship but by doing so he is going against his own beliefs. In Act one scene five hamlet has another soliloquy. It helps to characterize his as a dedicated. His dedication is emphasized when he says “And thy commandment all alone shall live within the book and volume of my brain, Unmix'd with baser matter: yes, by heaven!" Hamlet is basically saying that all other tasks will come second after his plan to avenge his father. Hamlet tells himself that he must not grow tired and that he has to accomplish his new task. Hamlet is both confident and courageous in this scene. It takes great courage to face the king and the diction on “At least I'm sure it may be so in Denmark," tells...
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