The Profound Meaning in the Nature Poetry of R. Frost

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The Profound Meaning in the Nature Poetry of R. Frost
Abstract:
This article is focusing on investigating the multidimensional nature in the eyes of Robert Frost. For him, nature is more than a friend or an enemy, sometimes it’s the human being ourselves. From some of his poem we can feel that the human intelligence might have a limited horizon which turned out to be a bar for the development between the nature and human beings. Key Word: R. Frost nature limitation ambiguity

Once people think of the poetry of Robert Lee Frost, whom the sole won four times of Pulitzer Price, it is natural to picture in their mind the pastoral landscape of rural New England which he lovingly described. The symbolic images include trees, leaves, snow, and, not surprisingly, frost. His poetry often reveal us the long stone walls, stretching across the grassy hills of the New England countryside, dark trees and mysterious woodlands, the hustle and bustle of energetic wildlife, gardens of flowers, flowing streams and brooks, and other images of rural farmland life. However, not a very successful farmer as he was, whom looked at the effects of nature on human beings and on their “land of living”, Frost, in the second thought, beyond the deceptively simple of depicting scenes from daily life, there is more inside his masterpieces. He has his ambiguities in his nature poetry that implied philosophic thoughts that engage with epistemological presuppositions, which examine the scope and limitation of human knowledge and confront the multi-sided nature of truth itself. According to Frost, the need of poetry springs from pains in life, since “every poem is an epitome of the great predicament; a figure of the will braving alien entanglements”(A Constant Symbol”87). Frost actually had a complicated relationship with nature. Sometimes they can be as sweet as lovers, while other times they were as cold as strangers or even enemies. Ask for the reason, it should trace it’s source to the nature itself. In one representative poem---two-line poem “The secret sits”, Frost reflects his understanding of the truth hidden in the skeptical nature: We dance around in a ring and suppose

But the Secret sits in the middle and knows
Such a attitude towards human’s capacity to interpret the system of nature is completed negative. Lawrance Thompson once wrote in “Robert Frost’s Theory of Poetry”, which explain Frost’s philosophic evaluation of truth: “He has ever grown tired in his own cautious search for truth, yet he has never been tempted to believe that absolute truth could be defined satisfactorily even by the most profound philosophical systems.” (“Theory of Poetry” 16~35) 1. The expanding conception of nature

Why is it so difficult to find out the truth of the nature? Cause for some level, search for the meaning of the frost is also a journey to get a thorough understanding of oneself, especially for Frost himself. It’s easily to be reminded that the image of “woods” and “frost” are exactly stands for the poet himself. Just looked at the following poem---“Into my own”: One of my wishes is that those dark trees,

So old and firm they scarcely show the breeze,
Were not, as ‘twere, the merest mask of gloom
But stretched away until the edge of doom.

I should not be withheld but that some day
Into their vastness I should steal away
Fearless of ever finding open land,
Or highway where the slow wheel pours the sand.

I do not see why I should ever turn back,
Or those should not set forth upon my track
To overtake me, who should miss me here
And long to know if still I held them dear.

They would not find me changed from him they knew---
Only more sure of all I thought was true.
In the first line we can see the ‘dark trees’ which represents the nature here. They are old and firm, hardly changed by the circumstance. Just echoed the ends “they would not...
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