The Legal Process of Discrimmination

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The Legal Process of Discrimination

Sylvia Goldstein

Employment Law/MGT434

July 30, 2012
Deborah Wilder

The Legal Process of Discrimination

According to a 2002 Rutgers University study, “forty-six percent of African American workers believe they have been treated unfairly by their employers, compared with 10 percent of whites and 28 percent of African Americans and 22 percent of Hispanics/Latinos have experienced workplace discrimination, compared with 6 percent of whites” (Massie for www.monster.com) For John a worker in the private sector these statistics are important if he should fall into one of these categories and is considering filing a discrimination charge based on race. Race is a protected class under Title VII for employers with 14 or more employees. Still John will need to consider all the factors related to pursuing a complaint or do nothing and subject himself to further stress. Discrimination in the workplace can take a toll, physically, mentally and emotionally. “The feelings of hopelessness, mistrust, despair and alienation are common among people facing bias, and they don't stop at the end of the workday. Stress and depression don't just affect employees at work but also at home among family, friends and loved ones” (Massie:www.monster.com). For John and all those who file complaints the burden of having to prove discrimination can be an agonizing toll. Still statistics from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) reveal,” the highest number of employment discrimination charges in its 45 year history was filed in the fiscal year ending on September 30, 2010” ( www.eeoc.gov). If John should consider pursuing, he will have to first file a charge with the EEOC, “By law, the EEOC must in some way handle every claim it receives” (Bennett-Alexander and Hartman, 2007). The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is responsible for enforcing federal laws that make it illegal to discriminate...
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