The Fall of the House of Usher

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 31
  • Published : December 16, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Research Paper: The Fall of the House of Usher

Edgar Allen Poe was a unique author who had a peculiar writing style. Similar to the eerie mood portrayed in the infamous story, “The Raven,” and the dark themes in “The Cask of Amontillado,” Poe did a fantastic job in channeling yet another ominous work, “The Fall of the House of Usher.” All of these stories have the same underlying elements of vivid imagery and mood. The mood is set in the beginning of the story with the reader picturing the bleak walls and desolate grounds of the mansion. As a result of focusing on several themes throughout his short story “The Fall of the House of Usher,” including human deception, interactions between characters and the house, and the psychological state of each character and their perception of reality, Poe allows himself to bring life to his works, as well as captivate his readers with his extremely mesmerizing fictional literature. In the beginning of the story, the unnamed narrator is traveling to visit an old friend, Roderick Usher, whom he claims he has known for a long time. Usher, who has fallen increasingly ill, wrote the narrator a letter asking him to come visit in his time of need. Although the narrator admits to not knowing Usher that well, he still feels obligated to go, almost as if he feels obligated to appease his friend. As he approaches the house, he notices the lethargic condition of the property. Everything, from trees to the lake, seemed to have caught the same disease that was causing everything to slowly decay. When the narrator reunited with Usher, his feeling was no different. Roderick Usher, a once lively and effervescent boy, was now a “ghastly pallor of the skin, and the now miraculous lustre of the eye, above all things startled and even awed me. The silken hair, too, had been suffered to grow all unheeded, and as, in its wild gossamer texture, it floated rather than fell about the face, I could not, even with effort, connect its Arabesque...
tracking img