The Exploration of the Rite of Spring Costumes

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: The Rite of Spring, Ballets Russes, Igor Stravinsky
  • Pages : 6 (2285 words )
  • Download(s) : 207
  • Published : March 26, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Greenshields #1
The research for this paper was based off a question that came to, while re-visiting the history and celebrating the one hundredth anniversary of Vaslav Nijinsky’s creation of Le Sacre du Printemps, The Right of Spring that premiered in 1913. This question in mind has many dimensions when asked, to compare the relationship between the costumes of Nijinsky’s The Right of Spring and Pina Bausch interpretation of the score. When researching both ballets in relationship to the costumes that were represented in each version it becomes unclear of the real reasons behind the choices that Nijinsky and Bausch made to develop the style, design and visual effect of the costumes; Questioning whether there was a specific initial inspiration for the designs or perhaps it was the style in the time period when both individual ballets premiered and was influenced by fashion and society. Beginning to study where it all began in the early 1900’s with Nijinsky’s development of The Right of Spring the focus is on the involvement of individuals who took part in the creation and development process of the original costumes. This can be narrowed down to Nicholas Roerich as the designer, Igor Stravinsky who potentially provided inspiration for Roerich’s designs and finally Nijinsky himself. To look at and discover how Roerich was inspired and where the root of his designs developed from other than Nijinsky’s vision, if any, brings this piece of writing one step closer to clearly answering the question of not only where the costumes initiated from but also how they compare to later ballet costume creations. Speaking of other ballet costumes, there will be research done on Pina Bausch’s 1975 interpretation of The Right of Spring with regard to her costumes in comparison to Nijinsky’s

Greenshields #2 costumes. The hopes are to gain a strong visual and rational understanding of the development the styles have gone through and the reasons for the advancement in ballet costumes. Having the opportunity to explore such a uniquely creative woman like Bausch, who had such an impact on the dance and choreography world, will allow this paper to go beyond a simple comparison between the costumes themselves but will allow further exploration of questions concerning how and why they developed into what they did. The suggestion of the time period potentially having an influence in the designs of Nijinsky’s and Roerich costumes also implies to Bausch’s costumes as well, which will coincide with the overall change that the performance ware came to since the early 1900’s to 1975. Exploring the relationship between Nijinsky’s in The Rite of Spring costumes in 1913, to Pina Bausch costumes in 1975 it is visually clear to pin point the different aspects each costume possesses. The challenging part of this piece of writing is going to be discussing how multiple costume creations come about from the same score, how such opposite but equally meaningful costumes can represent a similar story line in different eras, and overall where the inspiration came from, if inspired from anything or anyone at all for the costume designs in both Nijinsky’s and Bausch’s versions of The Right of Spring. Nijinsky hired Nicholas Roerich to help with the creations and designs for his costumes due to his outstanding and miraculous art work and the international reputation he had developed for himself over the previous years. They began their collaboration for The Right of Spring in the early 1900’s, a few years before the 1913 premier. Roerich was faced with a big commitment when he was asked to create and design the costumes that would make or break Nijinsky’s piece Greenshields #3 of artistic work. Roerich...
tracking img