The Downfall of Macbeth

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The Downfall of Macbeth
6th Stiles Armstrong 1 2-2-2013
Dual Comp 2

In Macbeth, it is arguable which of three negative forces, be they internal or external, is the reason for Macbeth’s downfall (determined when Duncan is murdered). William Shakespeare, the author of this play, bids three disconfirming forces as follows: the evil Lady Macbeth, Macbeth’s own “vaulting ambition,” and the witches who are known as the “three Weird Sisters.” Superiorly, Lady Macbeth’s shrewd attitude toward becoming Queen of Scotland compels Macbeth to get to a point where he will do anything to own the title, King of Scotland.

First, Macbeth’s vaulting ambition played an important role in his downfall alongside Lady Macbeth’s evil ways. Macbeth had heard his prophecies from the witches and secretly wanted to be King of Scotland as soon as possible after knowing he would be, eventually. He stated that “if chance will have me king, / Why Chance may crown me / without [me influencing the prophecy].”(1.3.92-96). He does not want to influence the prophecy to turn his way before it was destined to. With that being said, he still went against it by choice of himself after Lady Macbeth had made him think being King, now, would be the best for him.

Second, the witches had Macbeth believe being King was in his near future after he had realized their second prophecy was deemed true hence the new title he was given, Thane of Cawdor. His wife, being a master of convincing Macbeth into doing anything, had so much to do with him making his first move towards this dark turn of fate. Lady Macbeth made him believe the prophecies should happen now, and not by Chance. She bidded to him that prophecies were prophecies for a reason, and Chance had nothing to do with the outcome. He then goes back to what the witches had said to him. The first apparition states “…beware Macduff;/ Beware the...
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