The Crucible

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 307
  • Published : December 12, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview

Have you ever been accused of something you didn’t do and have been put on trial for it? Well, in the play “The Crucible” by Arthur Miller, many people were put on trial, and 20 were killed. The Crucible was based on a true story about the belief of witchcraft in Salem, Massachusetts. And it all started with a lie from a group of girls. There were 3 big themes in the play: Religion, False accusations, and Witchcraft.

The first theme is Religion. In the story, the accusers based their accusations solely on religion. For instance, if you did not know the 10 Commandments then you would be accused of witchcraft. They often asked innocent people to recite the Commandments, just to make sure. When asked to recite the commandments you must recite them without hesitation and mistakes or you would be looked at as a suspect of witchcraft. “Theology sir, is a fortress, no crack in the fortress may be accounted small” (Hale-947). Here John Proctor missed one of the commandments and now he is looked at more carefully. They also asked those who were already accused of witchcraft to recite them. “Do you know your commandments Elizabeth?” (Hale-946) He asked Elizabeth because she was already accused of witchcraft. They thought that what they were doing was ok because they said the bible said so. “I have no knowledge of it; the bible speaks of witches and I will not deny them” (Proctor-949). Proctor was getting questioned by Rev. Hale and he asked Proctor if he believed in witches, if he had said no, he would be suspicious of witchcraft, just as Elizabeth was.

The second theme was false accusations. The story was all about false accusations and lies. In Act I, Parris asked Abigail if she was conjuring spirits and she said “Not I sir, Tituba and Ruth” (Abigail-918). She falsely accused them when her intentions were to kill Goody Proctor by drinking the blood. Abigail was always finding new things to blame on Elizabeth. “Goody Proctor always kept...
tracking img