The Benefits of Using Hands-on Activities When Teaching Language Arts to First Through Fifth Grade Students

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SIGNATURE PAGE
This research paper was prepared by ______________ under the direction of Dr. ____________, OTED 636, Problems in Occupational and Technical Studies. It was submitted to the Graduate Program Director as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master Science in Occupational and Technical Studies. APPROVED BY:

_______________________

Date:
________________

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The researcher would like to thank all of those who helped provide a template for this study. An exceptional thanks to the students of the researcher, who had a one hundred percent pass rate on the language arts Standards of Learning. The researcher would also like to thank Dr. John Ritz for making the light at the end of the tunnel a little more visible. Nigel Daniels

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Table of Contents
SIGNATURE PAGEii
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSiii
TABLE OF TABLESvi
CHAPTER
I.INTRODUCTION1-2
Statement of the Problem2
Research Hypothesis2-3
Background and Significance3-4
Limitations4
Assumptions4-5
Procedures5
Definition of Terms5-7
Overview of Chapters7

II. REVIEW OF LITERATURE8
Description of Hands-On Language Arts 8-10 Activities for Elementary Students
Limitations of Hands-On Language Arts Activities10
Assets of Hands-On Language Arts Activities10-13
Components of Elementary Language Arts in
Hampton City Schools13-14
Reading and Language Arts Strategies 14-15 Summary15-16

III. METHODS AND PROCEDURES17
Population 17
Research Variables18
Instrument Design18
Methods of Data Collection19-20
Statistical Analysis20
Summary20

IV. FINDINGS21
Term Grades Comparisons21
Results22
Summary22

V. SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS, AND
RECOMMENDATIONS23
Summary23-25
Conclusion25-26
Recommendations26-27

REFERENCES28

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TABLE OF TABLES
TABLE
1. Comparison of Grades from the First and the Second Terms 20

Chapter I
Introduction
Paper and pencil work does not encourage analytical thinking; it can be used to measure the retention of information for a specific time period. For instance when a particular teacher who taught second grade in 2001-02, he taught a unit on verbs. The teacher standing at the board, explaining that verbs are action words, and having the students complete some activity sheets at their desks taught the unit. The following year the teacher moved up to the third grade with the same students. During the first term they had a review on verbs (that the teacher assumed was going to be easy), but when the students were asked what verb a was, they gave all kinds of answers except the right one. At this time the teacher realized that the lesson should be taught using a different method. The teacher then made a spinning wheel with four adjectives, four verbs, and four nouns. The students would spin the wheel and whatever word they landed on, they would ask themselves if they could do that word. If they could do it they knew it was a verb. Hampton City Schools had citywide language arts assessment four months later and there were two questions on the test asking students to identify the verb in the sentence and no one in the class missed either of those questions. Using manipulatives to teach the other components of language arts can be just as effective as it was for the researcher when teaching grammar. Many teachers have become conscious of the fact that not all students perform to the best of their capabilities. There are many different reasons that could affect student performance. They have short attention spans and have a propensity to become bored quickly. Many other children are capable, but they are just...
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