The Benefits of Physical Education

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D’Avery Handley
Mrs. Kokoski
English 1V
13 March 2012
The Benefits of Physical Education
Imagine the everyday life of a young teen. You wake up in the morning and take a shower. Eat a fatty breakfast. Then you go to school and eat a fatty snack. While you are at school the lunch is also just as bad. Go home and eat another fatty snack. For dinner you eat McDonald’s. Now imagine that for your everyday routine. Think about how much weight you would gain at a very young age. But if you took more than just one physical education class while you were in high school, you would be able to learn that you should not eat like that every single day. Regular physical activity is associated with a healthier, longer life style, and with a lower risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and most of all obesity. Despite all the benefits of physical activity has also contributed to a sharp increase in childhood obesity in the last decade. Given the fact the regular physical activity will help younger people stay healthier, and is an essential, component of childhood development, it is important that this be included as part of the regular school curriculum. Physical education is an important aspect of any school student’s curriculum. A daily well programmed and appropriately monitored physical students to increase their self-esteem, develop the knowledge, attitude, discipline, and confidence needed to maintain active lifestyles and acquire the skills needed to develop a positive attitude towards physical activity that will last a lifetime. As young people continue to become unhealthier, the increasing need forphysical education programs throughout schools become glaringly evident in their ability to provide about diet, lifestyle and exercise.

The history of physical education goes back to ancient times, if people think of it in the simple terms of fitness.Today, people actually think of physical education more in terms of health and physical education. Indeed, probably most schools in America today even separate health and physical education classes.The history of physical education verifies that in many of the ancient cultures sports, and fitness, were a way of life. Sports were often a way for young men to develop the skills and strength necessary to be warrior (Dalleck 2) .Young women were generally not involved in these sports because the sports were associated with military training. The ancient Persians, Assyrians, Greeks, and Romans all had fitness training regimens and young men expected to serve in the military (Dalleck 2).

The first modern physical education movement, which was centered on physical fitness, came in the form of gymnastics programs becoming especially prevalent in Germany, Denmark, Sweden, and Great Britain.The growth of gymnastics in Germany can be primarily attributed to the work of two physical educators: Johann Guts Muths and Friedrich Jahn. Muths invented numerous exercise programs and the equipment upon which they were performed (Dalleck 3). As you look at the history of physical education in Europe from the 18th and 19th centuries and you can see its impact on American schools. As Europeans moved to the United states they brought with them aspects of their culture, including views on education (Dalleck 3). Within Europe, schools had been an important institution used for spreading the idea of the importance of physical education to society. Physical education was woven into their educational systems.

In the United States, the early educational process focused primarily on intellectual matters. Schools concentrated on teaching traditional subjects including reading, writing, arithmetic, and religious matters. Most American schools were founded with deeply religious often Christian foundations (Dalleck 4). Physical education remained missing from the public education system for the better part of the nineteenth century. Despite the relative lack of interest in...
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