Student

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 141
  • Published : April 7, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
TOP TEN REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD STUDY PHILOSOPHY

1. Philosophy stimulates one’s abilities to think critically, creatively, and enhance analytical and interpretive capacities.

2. Students with an emphasis in Philosophy generally develop an interest in self-expression and reflection and enjoy debating ideas, skills which provide the ability to deal with the complex problems for which there are no easy answers.

3. Instead of one particular skill, philosophy prepares students for careers in a wide field of professions, such as law, medicine, government, business, journalism, publishing, teaching and the ministry.

4. In a global environment, people who are able to use critical thought and imagination are especially sought for by employers.

5. Are you interested in actively participating in the future of this society and country? Studying Philosophy helps one become a better citizen by promoting the ability to listen carefully, critically evaluate and respond thoughtfully to the claims that others make. These are the fundamental skills we need as citizens to engage in the sort of public discourse that is essential to a healthy democratic process.

6. Students follow in the footsteps of famous Philosophy majors as Phil Jackson (Chicago Bulls), Umberto Eco (Novelist), Carly Fiorina (CEO of Hewlett-Packert), Aung San Suu Kyi (Burmanese Human Rights Activist and Nobel Peace Prize Winner), David Souter (Supreme Court Justice), Bruce Lee (Movie Star), Harrison Ford (Sexiest Man Alive, People Magazine 1998), Tom Morris (Corporate Consultant), and Robert MacNamamara (Former Secretary of Defense and Head of the World Bank).

7. Philosophy students are more likely than computer scientists to land jobs immedietely after graduation. In a study rleased by Higher Education Statistics Agency, 63% had jobs, 15% pursued further full time education, and only 7% were unemployed. Source: Times Higher Education Supplement, August, 2004. p9 (1).

8. Thinking about and discussing the most urgent question: the meaning of Being (Martin Heidegger).

9. Studying in an environment where the “art of disagreeing” is practiced.

10. Philosophy students acquire eligibility to become part of the famous Philosophy Club at College of DuPage. -------------------------------------------------

Definition of Philosophy

How can we define philosophy? Philosophy could be defined in many different ways. Sometimes one definition very easily overlaps another definition. In some instances, two different definitions create a new definition. Using Hegel's terminology, a "new synthesis." Furthermore, we can say that every definition of philosophy brings meaning and relevance into the human patrimony. However, we feel we need first of all to understand what is it we mean when we speak of the word "definition." In its most simplistic meaning, definition is view as the act of defining, a statement of meaning. Such meaning needs to have relevance to the person who is receiving the information. Such meaning could contain a set of different layers that would determine the real significance it's trying to convey. Things such as culture, language spoken or written, gender roles, prejudices, education, knowledge, personal interests, all of these items, are the ones that constitute the real meaning of the word definition. Therefore, as one attempts to define any term in contemporary language, one needs to comprehend the different coatings of meaning behind any word. At the same time, one needs to take into consideration the changes of language through time. Language is living phenomena, a phenomenon that is constantly changing. If we considered this element in the construction of our definition of philosophy, we will understand that a definition only attempts to bring the student closer to the ultimate meaning if indeed there is one....
tracking img