Stage Models in Health Promotion

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  • Topic: Behavior, Transtheoretical model, Psychology
  • Pages : 4 (1148 words )
  • Download(s) : 842
  • Published : January 29, 2013
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ORIGINS OF TMC cont.
Underlying assumptions of TMC:
1. No single theory accounts for all behavior change.
2. Behavior change unfolds over time.
3. Stages are both stable and open to change.
4. Without planned intervention, populations will remain mired in early stages. 5. The majority of at risk population not ready for action. 6. Specific processes and principles of change need to be applied at specific stages. 7. Behavior is not random. Chronic behavior patterns are under some combo of biological, social, psychological influences. 8. Behavioral change typically consists of several attempts. Person may progress, backslide, and cycle and recycle through stages.

THE STAGES OF CHANGE; TRANSTHEORETICAL MODEL OF CHANGE
PRECONTEMPLATION (PC): People have no intention of changing (within next 6 mos). CONTEMPLATION (C): People engage in cognitive process. Decisional balance, which represents mental weighing of pros and cons assoc with changing behavior (similar to benefits and barriers). Process begins with favoring cons. Clearly implications for behavior change interventions are based on: (1) enhancing perceptions of the advantages of changing behavior. (2) minimizing perception of barriers to adopting these behavioral changes. PREPARATION (PR): People intend to adopt new behavior in immediate future (within next month). ACTION (A): People have made specific overt modifications in their lifestyles within past 6 mos. Behavioral change has often been equated with action. However , not all changes qualify as action. Ex: promoting smoking cessation, only total abstinence counts. MAINTENANCE: (M): final stage. People still work to prevent relapse. Do not need to apply change process as frequently as do people in action stage. Specified behavior for 6 mos or longer. TMC supports the idea process of behavior change is “evolutionary, not revolutionary”. Relapse may be less important than the stage person relapses...
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