Spotted Horses vs. Mule in the

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“Spotted Horses” Vs. “Mule in the Yard”
William Faulkner wrote two short stories, which are alike in many aspects. “Spotted Horses” and “Mule in the Yard” are short stories that both involve comic animal chases and financial transactions. Even though the stories are written by the same author, have similar characteristics, and share similar plot features, they are entirely different stories. The stories are both examples of interpretive literature, however “Spotted Horses” is a more interpretive short story than “Mule in the Yard because “Spotted Horses” fits Perrine’s profile of interpretive literature, and “Mule in the Yard” seems to replicate Perrine’s profile of escape literature. According to Laurence Perrine in his seventh edition of Literature: Structure, Sound and Sense he states the definition of interpretive literature is “Literature written to deepen and broaden and sharpen our awareness of life.” Interpretive literature is not candy coated. It allows its readers to experience the trials and tribulations of life. By using graphically realistic plots and endings, which are consistent to those in real life, interpretive literature achieves a higher literary value than escape literature. Interpretive literature allows its reader too step out of the fantasy world they might be living in and focus on what the world is really about. One might say an interpretive story provides insight to understanding. Not only understanding of ourselves, but our neighbors, friends, family or anyone else we might encounter. Escape literature is the complete opposite of interpretive literature. Escape literature is written purely for entertainment. Escape literature takes it’s reader out of the real world and into a fantasy world where everything works and happens just like we want it to. This is a world where the ending always has...
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