Space Exploration

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  • Topic: Human spaceflight, Spaceflight, Yuri Gagarin
  • Pages : 2 (647 words )
  • Download(s) : 192
  • Published : May 13, 2011
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Good morning dear professor and my schoolmates.
As most of you know, my name is Martina Marčoková.
I would like to thank you for coming today to hear my presentation that is part of my final evaluation of this subject. I am going to talk about space exploration.
It might be useful to start with a brief outline of my presentation. Firstly I will talk about history of space exploration, secondly I will mention first flights and first human flights and lastly I will tell you something about the future of space exploration. If you may have any questions please ask them at the end of my presentation. So let me start with history of space exploration

From our small world we have gazed upon the cosmic ocean for untold thousands of years. Ancient astronomers observed points of light that appeared to move among the stars. They called these objects planets, meaning wanderers, and named them after Roman deities -- Jupiter, king of the gods; Mars, the god of war; Mercury, messenger of the gods; Venus, the god of love and beauty, and Saturn, father of Jupiter and god of agriculture. The stargazers also observed comets with sparkling tails, and meteors or shooting stars apparently falling from the sky. Let me now turn attention to the first flights and first human flights. The first successful orbital launch was of the Soviet unmanned Sputnik ("Satellite I") mission on October 4, 1957. The satellite weighed about 83 kg (184 pounds), and is believed to have orbited Earth at a height of about 250 km (150 miles). Analysis of the radio signals was used to gather information about the electron density of the ionosphere, while temperature and pressure data was encoded in the duration of radio beeps. The results indicated that the satellite was not punctured by a meteoroid. Sputnik 1 was launched by an R-7 rocket. It burned up upon re-entry on January 3, 1958. In the meantime, the Soviet dog Laika became the first animal in orbit on November 3, 1957. The first successful human...
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