Somalia Pirates: Rise and Outcome

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 48
  • Published : April 10, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Regional Studies
400592.01E
Prof. Dr. José Magone
Wintersemester 2010/2011

The Rise and Outcome of piracy in Somalia
Katharina Urban
297114

7

Contents
1 Introduction.......................................................................................................................1 2 Historical Background......................................................................................................2 3 Reasons for Piracy.............................................................................................................3 3.1 Enabling Environment.......................................................................................4 3.2 Environmental Issues.........................................................................................4 4 Evolvement and Classification of Pirates........................................................................6 5 Outcome.............................................................................................................................7 7 Conclusion..........................................................................................................................7

7

1 Introduction
In the afternoon of Tuesday, 8th of February 2011, an Italian petroleum tanker was hijacked in the Indian Ocean close to the coastline of Somalia. The 22 man strong crew of the tanker “Savina Caylyn” was attacked by five pirates east of the Yemeni island Sokotra. The crew had to capitulate after being threatened by assault rifles and machine guns. This was one of the most spectacular aggressions happening within 2011 and widely covered by the international media. While the Italian tanker is now maneuvered into the waters of Somalia, approximately another 700 seaman and 30 hijacked ships are waiting for it to arrive.

With this paper I want to bring some light into the matter of the evolving piracy within the coastline of Somalia. I intend to clarify the reasons for this seemingly limitless and unstoppable violence. First, I want to give an overall impression of the general background of the country of Somalia which is often called the “failed state”. Also, it is important to deal with the pirates themselves. I want to show who those pirates are and what motives guide them to act this way. Furthermore, it is important to show the outcome of this threat within the Gulf of Aden. The increase of shipping costs and thus the rise of prices of goods or the impediment of food aid shipments are just two I want to mention in this brief foreword.

7

2 Historical Background
According to the Failed States Index Scores of 2008, Somalia comes in first out of 177 countries. It polls worst regarding criminalization, economical growth, and complex humanitarian emergencies, having 114 out of 120 points (the less points the better). But how did the country get into this predicament? How can it be that the transitional government, impeached in 1991, finds itself extremely challenged by trying to introduce some kind of political order and infrastructure at least within its capital Mogadishu? By explaining the historical background of Somalia, developed from an Arab sultanate to the collapse of the Siad Barre regime in 1991, it will become clear how torn apart the country and its people have to be.

In want to start right off with the time of colonization at the end of the nineteenth century. British and Italian colonists took possession of Somalia in consideration of various reasons. Britain took over the northern part in 1884 with the aim “to establish a coaling station on the Red Sea coast to strengthen naval links with their Indochina colonies.”1 When Italy arrived in 1888 it was totally inexperienced in occupying foreign territory and therefor “it was [...] content to stake out a territory whenever it could do so without confronting another colonial power.“2

The two colonies finally allied on July 1st, 1960. Thus, the country gained independency and the...
tracking img