Solar Air Conditioning

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  • Topic: HVAC, Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning, Air conditioner
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  • Published : April 25, 2013
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A national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Innovation for Our Energy Future

A Zero Carryover Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Solar Applications Preprint
A. Lowenstein
AIL Research, Inc.

Conference Paper
NREL/CP-550-39798 July 2006

S. Slayzak and E. Kozubal
National Renewable Energy Laboratory
To be presented at ASME International Solar Energy Conference (ISEC2006) Denver, Colorado July 8–13, 2006

NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle

Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337

NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or any agency thereof. Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone: 865.576.8401 fax: 865.576.5728 email: mailto:reports@adonis.osti.gov Available for sale to the public, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 phone: 800.553.6847 fax: 703.605.6900 email: orders@ntis.fedworld.gov online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm

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Proceedings of ISEC2006 ASME International Solar Energy Conference July 8-13, 2006, Denver, CO

ISEC2006-99079
A ZERO CARRYOVER LIQUID-DESICCANT AIR CONDITIONER FOR SOLAR APPLICATIONS ANDREW LOWENSTEIN AIL RESEARCH, INC. PRINCETON, NJ ail@ailr.com STEVEN SLAYZAK AND ERIC KOZUBAL NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY GOLDEN, CO

ABSTRACT A novel liquid-desiccant air conditioner that dries and cools building supply air has been successfully designed, built, and tested. The new air conditioner will transform the use of directcontact liquid-desiccant systems in HVAC applications, improving comfort and indoor air quality, as well as providing energy-efficient humidity control Liquid-desiccant conditioners and regenerators are traditionally implemented as adiabatic beds of contact media that are highly flooded with desiccant. The possibility of droplet carryover into the supply air has limited the sale of these systems in most HVAC applications. The characteristic of the new conditioner and regenerator that distinguishes them from conventional ones is their very low flows of liquid desiccant. Whereas a conventional conditioner operates typically at between 10 and 15 gpm (630 and 946 ml/s) of desiccant per 1000 cfm (0.47 m3/s) of process air, the new conditioner operates at 0.5 gpm (32 ml/s) per 1000 cfm (0.47 m3/s). At these low flooding rates, the supply air will not entrain droplets of liquid...
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