Should Moms Stay at Home

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Should Moms Stay at Home?
Matt Sayar, Austin Foggs, Jackie Doughty, Dimitri Scott, Luke Hobbs Hobbs

For the yes side of the argument, writer of the article from Time Magazine “The Case for Staying Home”, Claudia Wallis, says more and more women are choosing to stay at home. This article published on March 22, 2004 claims the ever increasing workload women are facing at work and home is forcing them not to just prioritize but to kick one to the curb. Wallis claims when this question arises most women are choosing to stay home with their children, and as she puts it, “most of these women are choosing not so much to drop out as to stop out.” Although some disagree, Wallis attributes this growing number of women staying at home to two general causes; The Generation Factor, Maternal Desire and Doubts. Firstly, The Generation Factor centers on the idea that women are moving away from the more independent, show the world what we’re made of mentality and toward a better work life balance. Not to say they are regressing, but actually growing more comfortable doing what they want with their lives. Next, the Maternal Desire and Doubts theory is formed with the idea that women are tired of leaving their parenting up to someone getting paid to do so. Instead of constantly worrying about whether or not their child is getting the attention or support they need, more women are choosing to be in direct contact with their children at all times. Wallis also explores the fact that most work places make it very difficult to be a mother and business woman and how some companies are trying to change this under the heading Building On-Ramps. She states that studies from a sociologist, Pamela Stone on “professional women who have dropped out” show many women are discouraged to see their expensive college degrees going to waste. Likewise, how many women hope more companies start following the trend that PricewaterhouseCoopers is setting? This company is on a mission to make working more doable for mothers who want to work part time. Wallis then shows her interest in these types of programs. Saying, “on-ramps, slow lanes, flexible options and respect for all such pathways can’t come soon enough for mother eager to set examples and offer choices for the next generation.” The argument Wallis is making is not that women want to skip college and become stay at home moms, but rather they want to use their natural abilities as mothers when the time comes and still act on their education as well. However, when their children are grown they would like to be able to return to the work force in one way or another. Finally, with companies like PWC and others working with these mothers to meet this goal more and more women are choosing to stay at home. Neil Gilbert argues the NO perspective of "Should Moms stay at home”. In the introduction of his article "What Do Women Really Want?” Gilbert starts off with some data from other sources which suggests women are opting out of the rat race to raise their children. (Gilbert 81) In 2004 ,Time had an article named " The Case for Staying Home: Why More Young Moms Are Opting Out of the Rat Race", this article was about supporting the opt- out revolution, whatever it is women really want, they pretty much want the same thing when it comes to career and family (Gilbert 82). Gilbert points out that the problem of the article was the lack of evidence to show data. Gilbert exemplifies within the article how some things have changed over time. He agrees that more women in earlier times stayed at home due to the fact that women based their economic survival on the men; however, that was before women had the chance of equal-opportunity (82). As time goes by numbers from the past and the future has drastically changed, within the article, it breaks down all the women into four different groups: traditional, neo-traditional, modern, and post-modern. Traditionally, women that had three children or more, in 1976 approx....
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