Should Any Vaccines Be Required for Children?

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SHOULD ANY VACCINES BE REQUIRED FOR CHILDREN?
SHOULD ANY VACCINES BE REQUIRED FOR CHILDREN?

Most Vaccinations protect people from certain diseases which can make them sick, disabled or can in some cases even kill them. The vaccination helps boosts people’s body’s defence system, also known as the immune system. Vaccines create immunity which protects people from infections without causing suffering of the disease itself. Vaccines can also be called shots, immunizations or needles.

(Smith, n.d.)

Most vaccines contain a disease that is either very weak or dead. However, they do not contain a type of disease that can make people sick. Some vaccines do not contain any germs at all. Putting that little bit of disease inside the body makes the body’s defence system produce antibodies which fight off that kind of disease. The body makes antibodies in two different ways, one way is by getting the disease or the vaccine, however getting the vaccine is much safer when making the antibodies without having the risk of become disabled or maybe dying. The antibodies stay with the human for a very long period of time. These antibodies remember how to fight off a certain disease, which means that if the germ causes that disease enters the body at a later date, the body’s defence system will automatically know how to fight it off because of the antibodies. Most of the time the body’s defence system will remember how to fight the disease/germ for the rest of the human’s life. However, sometimes defence systems need a little reminder, a booster shot to remind the defence system how to fight off the disease/germ. In the first two years of a baby’s life they are given several different vaccines to protect them. The table below shows each vaccine that a baby gets all the way up to six years old. The table also shows how many doses a baby’s get of each vaccine and when they are given them. The majority of babies do not have side effects from vaccines, however if they do they are normally nothing serious. ‘Some vaccines may cause low fever, a rash or soreness at the spot where the shot was given. Although the body may seem like it is getting sick after the vaccination, these reactions are good signs that the immune system is working and learning to fight off infections’ ((CDC), n.d.). In rare cases, a baby may have a serious allergic reaction to a vaccine. Signs of a serious allergic reaction include: * Breathing problems and wheezing

* Swelling of the throat
* Being hoarse
* Weakness
* Dizziness
* Fast heartbeat
* Hives
* Paleness ((CDC), n.d.)
Vaccinations are quick and highly effective. Once a child has been vaccinated against a disease, their body can then fight that disease more effectively if they come into contact with it. If a child is not vaccinated they can have an increased risk of catching the illness.

((CDC), n.d.)
Age| Vaccine| Information| Problems|
2 Months old| 5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib)| ‘The 5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine is used to protect against separate disease which include: Diphtheria, Tetanus, Whooping cough, Polio and Haemophilus influenza type b’. (NHS, n.d.)| ‘Diphtheria: Can be a highly contagious infection that generally affects the throat and nose and less commonly, it can affect the skin. The bacteria spreads when an infected person coughs or sneezes and their saliva enter another person’s nose or mouth. The symptoms of Diphtheria include: * High temperature (fever) * Sore throat * Breathing difficultiesTetanus: Tetanus is a very serious infection but is also very rare. It is caused by bacteria. It normally occurs when an open wound becomes contaminated. If it is not treated it may lead to complications which can end up being fatal. Tetanus is caused by a type of bacteria called Clostridium tentai. This bacteria can live in many different substances which include: * Soil * House dust * Animal and human waste (manure)Whooping Cough: Whooping...
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