Serial Killers

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s): 879
  • Published: October 8, 1999
Read full document
Text Preview
Serial Murder
The mind behind the crime!

Thesis statement: Serial Murderers are not just murderers but also victims of the rotten hand they were dealt.
Abstract

I.Definition

History
A.The Most Infamous Killer
B.Myth Theory
1. WereWolves
2. Vampires

III.Causes
A. Serial Killer Characteristics
B. Theories

VI.Case Studies
A.Charles Manson
1. Bibliographical Info
2. Childhood Trauma

B. John Wayne Gacy
1. Bibliographical Info
2. Childhood Trauma

V.The Female Serial Killer

IV.Closing

Abstract -Thesis Statement

“ God, I’ve never done anything. Help me, help me, help me! God, why is this happening? Help Me!” Robert Violante screamed as the Son of Sam’s .44 caliber bullet tore through his temple (Mitchell p.15). At this moment Robert Violante must have asking himself why this was happening, what could cause someone to do something so atrocious? This paper examines issues related to the definition and study of serial murder. It probes the minds of some of the world’s most infamous killers all the while asking the question WHY. It examines methodological issues such as problems with the FBI’s so called serial murder profiling system: the fact that the serial killer stereotypes does not necessarily stand true. This paper argues that the killer is not the only one to blame for his/her actions. Together we will probe the minds of killers such as Charles Manson and John Wayne Gacy. I ask you, “Are they Murderers or Victims?” I personally have come to the conclusion that they are both murderers and victims.

I. Definition:

“Serial murder” has long been a term used to describe those human beings that repeatedly commit heinous crimes. It is rare that the average person probes the mind of a serial killer without bias. However, what lies behind the eyes of a serial killer deserves more than the cold hard look that society so often gives (Aaronson, Internet). To truly understand a serial killer, we must put aside our media born misconceptions and look upon them with an unbiased attitude. A serial killer is not a person gone mad for no reason at all. A serial killer emerges from the pain and suffering of a life riddled with abuse, neglect, hormonal imbalances, and numerous other situations. Serial murder is a disease and there are valid explanations that help us to realize that these individuals experienced events so traumatic in their early life that they became dead to their surroundings; attaining no sense of moral autonomy (Mitchell p. 23). Just listen to the definition of a serial killer. A serial killer is described as a Caucasian male in his late twenties or early thirties who kills three or more people with a cooling off period in-between. This definition is yet another example of the cold shoulder society gives these people; in this definition there is complete disregard for the problem. II. History:

The Most Infamous Serial Killer!

Jack the Ripper is undoubtedly the most infamous serial killer of all. No other evokes such vivid images, the shrill cry of newsboys “Whitechapel! Another ‘orrible murder! Mutilation!” The fear struck into the hearts of everyone at the sight of a shadowed figure (Bardsley p. 1). Jack the Ripper murdered and raped five prostitutes in back alleys, lurking in the shadows. But in retrospect, compared to today, the murders of five prostitutes by Jack would barely make it to the head lines. However, there are more books written on Jack than all the American presidents combined. Given the murders of modern society, we must ask ourself why we are obsessed with Jack. We are obsessed because this represents the classic “whodunit.” “He comes from out of the fog, kills violently and quickly, and disappears without a trace. Then for no apparent reason, he satisfies his blood...
tracking img