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  • Topic: Jabberwocky, The Hunting of the Snark, Lewis Carroll
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  • Published : May 12, 2013
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JABBERWOCKY
Lewis
Carroll
(from
Through
the
Looking‐Glass
and
What
Alice
Found
There,
1872)

`Twas
brillig,
and
the
slithy
toves


Did
gyre
and
gimble
in
the
wabe:
All
mimsy
were
the
borogoves,


And
the
mome
raths
outgrabe.

"Beware
the
Jabberwock,
my
son!


The
jaws
that
bite,
the
claws
that
catch!
Beware
the
Jubjub
bird,
and
shun


The
frumious
Bandersnatch!"

He
took
his
vorpal
sword
in
hand:


Long
Lme
the
manxome
foe
he
sought
‐‐
So
rested
he
by
the
Tumtum
tree,


And
stood
awhile
in
thought.

And,
as
in
uffish
thought
he
stood,


The
Jabberwock,
with
eyes
of
flame,
Came
whiffling
through
the
tulgey
wood,


And
burbled
as
it
came!
One,
two!
One,
two!
And
through
and
through

 The
vorpal
blade
went
snicker‐snack!
He
leU
it
dead,
and
with
its
head


He
went
galumphing
back.

"And,
has
thou
slain
the
Jabberwock?


Come
to
my
arms,
my
beamish
boy!
O
frabjous
day!
Callooh!
Callay!'


He
chortled
in
his
joy.

`Twas
brillig,
and
the
slithy
toves


Did
gyre
and
gimble
in
the
wabe;
All
mimsy
were
the
borogoves,


And
the
momerathsoutgrabe.

Possible
interpretations
of
words


■
 Bandersnatch:
A
swift
moving
creature
with
snapping
jaws,
capable
of
extending
its
neck.

 A
'bander'
was
also
an
archaic
word
for
a
'leader',
suggesting
that
a
'bandersnatch'
might
be
aan
animal
that
hunts
the
leader
of
a
group.


 ■
Beamish:
Radiantly
beaming,
happy,
cheerful.
Although
Carroll
may
have
believed
he
had
 coined
this
word,
it
is
cited
in
the
Oxford
English
DicLonary
in
1530.
 ■
Borogove:
Following
the
poem
Humpty
Dumpty
says
"
'borogove'
is
a
thin
shabby‐looking
 bird
with
its
feathers
sticking
out
all
round,
something
like
a
live
mop."
In
explanatory
book
 notes
Carroll
describes
it
further
as
"an
extinct
kind
of
Parrot.
They
had
no
wings,
beaks
...
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