Seafood America

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Master in Business Administration
School of Business and Management
Xavier University

SEAFOOD AMERICA:
CORPORATE RESPONSE TO AIDS
Case #3

Dr. Alma Frances R. Hortelano
MBA 111B Dynamics of Management

CHRISTINE R. LAURENTE
MBA 1
SEAFOOD AMERICA: CORPORATE RESPONSE TO AIDS
CASE #3

I. Point of View:
Case writer

II. Statement of the Problem:
What can Seafood Industry do for the company & its employees at the prevalence of HIV/AIDS?Predicaments threat on: * Loss of experienced personnel – particularly at the mngt.& skilled workers levels; * Need for increased resources to hire and retrain replacements; * Increase in absenteeism and labor turnover;

* Loss of productivity;
* Increased health care and funeral costs.

III. Objective:
1. To formulate policies that will guide restaurant managers in deciding what to do in tragic cases like AIDS;the broad objectives of the policy are to: I. Provide protection from discrimination in the workplace to people living with HIV/AIDS; II. Prevent HIV/AIDS spread amongst workers;

III. Provide care, support and counseling for those infected and affected; 2. To maintain the reputation of Seafood America vis-à-vis its Corporate Social Responsibility;

IV. Areas of Consideration:
Seafood America, a nationalchain of restaurants (with 25 branches in 22 cities) for fresh seafood was founded by John Andrews of, Cheyenne, Wyoming in 1975. It was sold at the end of 1983 to Amalgamated Foods-a distinguished food processing company run by the CEO Jack Matthews. Along its doubled expansion in 1985, AIDS became prevalent also.

AIDS is a virus present in the blood, semen and vaginal secretion that works by destroying the body’s immune systems. The latest reports in 1986 from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) indicated that more than one million Americans have already been infected with the virus while 122,000 had developed full blown AIDS and 42000 have died in 1989.

The deep predicament of Jack Matthew started at a reported virus infection brought by the employee himself to Cheyenne restaurant Manager. The second case came from a regular customer who happened to be a nurse divulging that one of its waiters John is being treated for Aids. The normal policy at Seafood America was to give a certain amount of SICK LEAVE and to pay the full cost of medical care for its employees.

Given this prognosis, Matthews knows that he needed a formal policy to help the restaurantmanagers decide what to do in these tragic cases.

V. Alternative Courses of Action:
1. Examine applicable laws when handling HIV/AIDS cases in the workplace then reevaluate company policies and set guidingprinciples for managers to take. 2. Conduct testing to all employees and lay-off those infected. This will save the company cost of medication. VI. Recommendation:

The first course of action is recommended. It is assumed that the Manager has examinedapplicable laws when handling HIV/AIDS issues in the workplace prior policy evaluations.
(The ADA does not require an employer to hire or retain an individual whose disability poses a "direct threat" to the health or safety of others or to him/herself. Direct threat means that an individual poses a significant risk of substantial harm to self or others, and covers concerns about transmission of infectious diseases, including HIV infection. A direct threat determination must be done on an individualized basis, assessing both the individual with a disability, his/her essential job functions, and the workplace. The assessment of risk must be based on current, objective medical or other factual evidence. A speculative or remote risk will not constitute a direct threat. If a direct threat is identified, the employer must determine whether a reasonable accommodation will eliminate or reduce the risk so that it is below the level of a direct threat.)...
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