Sarahs Key

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Did soldiers ever show humanity to the people in the concentration camps?

In the book Sarah’s Key, the description of the concentration camps was unimaginable. The living conditions and treatment the Jews received was sickening, but occasionally the soldiers did show humanity towards the Jews.
“For God’s sake, run! Run now, quick, both of you. If they see you… Take off your stars. Try to find help. Be carful! Good luck” (Rosnay 92) said a young policeman to Sarah and Rachel, two characters with major roles in the book. The policeman guarding the camp let the two girls sneak away through the barbwire fence, pretending not to see them. This act of humanity by the policeman was strongly looked down upon, and could have resulted in death if caught. Not only was this policeman humane in the book, but incidents like this also happened in history. “My father convinced a French guard to let our family stay together because my mother was ill from tuberculosis” (Cecile Widerman Kaufer). Cecile Widerman Kaufer, a holocaust survivor who was also able to escape the camp thanks to a French guard that showed humanity towards her family.

Like Sarah and Rachel, where did Jews go to find refuge after escaping the camps?

In Sarah’s Key, Geneviève and Jules are static characters that represented a harborer during the holocaust/Vel’ d’Hiv roundup. They symbolized the brave citizens that risked their lives to hide and care for the children who escaped the concentration camps. “A great number of Jewish children survived, thanks to the help and generosity of French families or religious institutions that took them in” (Rosnay 126). Once the children found a home that was willing to take them in “they must be hidden at once” (Rosnay 110) because if they were found they would either be killed or be brought back to the camps for worse punishment. The harborers provided a safe haven for the Jews. Every rescue story is different, “I don’t consider myself a hero, but...
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