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  • Topic: Vestibular system, Sensory system, Sensory integration dysfunction
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  • Published : March 21, 2013
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The Effectiveness of A Balance Board Program On Vestibular Function In Children With Autism With Sensory Integration Problems

Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for research methodology

Submitted to:

Sir Romel Cabazor

Go, Krishia Kaye

Tobes, Stephanie

Velez College

CHAPTER I

THE PROBLEM AND ITS SETTING

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A BALANCE BOARD ON VESTIBULAR FUNCTION IN KIDS WITH SENSORY INTEGRATION PROBLEMS

Introduction

Three sources of sensory information are used by the nervous system in the maintenance of equilibrium. These are the eyes, proprioceptive endings throughout the body and the vestibular portion of the internal ear.

In the development of the human body functions, the vestibular system is one of the first of the sensory integrative systems to be fully functional. The complete integration of the other sensory systems like vision and proprioception are continued throughout childhood through some activities that facilitate active use of the other systems, such as being carried upright to increase the visual pursuit of the child. It can be said that the vestibular system is the basic platform and organization body on which all sensory systems can rely upon as a foundation on which to grow and develop on.

According to Jean Ayers in her book, Sensory integration and the child, it explains. “The vestibular system is the unifying system. It forms the basic relationship of a person to gravity and to the physical world. All other parts of sensation are processed in reference to this basic vestibular information. The activity in the vestibular system provides a framework for the other aspects of our experience. Vestibular input seems to prime the entire nervous system to function effectively. When the vestibular system does not function in a consistent and accurate way, the interpretations of other sensations will be inconsistent and inaccurate, and the nervous system will have trouble getting started” (Ayers, Sensory Integration and the child)

Knowing that, there are children who suffer developmental disorders that have shaken the foundation on which the sensory systems stand on. With an incomplete vestibular sense, the other senses cannot develop properly, and will lead on to more serious problems later on in life.

The balance board, originally used for skiers and surfers to train on, was recognized and touted as a therapy for the correction of abnormal vestibular functions. The Learning Breakthrough Program, a balance board program developed by Frank A. Belgau and Beverly Belgau in 2004 is one that aims to maximize vestibular functions and help organize the person’s systems.

Doing balance board activities trains the whole sensory system by working with proprioception and the vestibular system. These key threads in the neurological web of our brain are the mechanism whereby simply standing on the balance board activates our entire brain and opens up our sensory channels for more efficient learning. When we stand solidly on the board we are using both hemispheres of the brain. The result is that information is taken in, while standing on the board, is learned faster, retained longer, with better comprehension. When both sides of the brain are working together, the ability to process, file and store information is more efficient. A session in the balance board leaves the brain in a more organized state. (Dr. Jean Ayers - sensory integration and the child, 1979)

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

The aim of the study is to determine the effectiveness of a balance board on vestibular function in children with sensory integration problems

Specifically it seeks to answer the following questions:

1. What are the demographics of the study?

a. Age

b. Sex

c. Diagnosis

d. Race

2. What effects will the balance board do for the child?

3. What is the...
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