Rousseau the Social Contract

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Jamal Hamilton
3/4/13
Explanatory Essay
Explanatory Essay #5
In the Social Contract, Rousseau describes some rules of administration in the civil order in which I feel Rousseau distributes some solid effective prescription on how to deal with the emergence and prevalence of social disorder that he laid out in the Discourse. The main point from the Discourse that’s in the Social Contract which are Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains. the Sovereign, having no force other than the legislative power, acts only by means of the laws; and the laws being solely the authentic acts of the general will, the Sovereign cannot act save when the people is assembled. Every law the people have not ratified in person is null and void is, in fact, not a law and the last point is that the legislative power belongs to the people, and can belong to it alone. Rousseau points out in the general will by saying individuals like the general will and follow laws established by the general will, they abide by the Social Contract and also remain free and independent, each person obeying only laws prescribes for their self. In a society ruled by the general will, cooperation for the common good is parallel with the freedom of each citizen. The Next point in the Social Contract is the part where Rousseau talks about dependence and how human people are dependent animals who depend on nature and on other humans for their needs. Dependence on nature is not a problem since nature provides air to breathe, water to drink, the wherewithal for food and shelter without that we don’t survive. Dependence on other humans is different because it threatens our freedom because we are in control of somebody else Being dependent on other people will make someone to be subject to their will, and if one obeys the will of another, one is not free. Rousseau said that the free individual is one who obeys only his own will, or more explicitly, one who obeys no will other than his own.

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