Romeo and Juliet

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Romeo & Juliet Essay

Fate, most people don’t even believe in it; in fact some don’t even know what it is. There are many definitions of Fate, but most seem to revolve around something like a force—in which no one can control—in life. But one of the few people—in that small percentage—that do believe in fate, so happens to include William Shakespeare himself, and he tries to proof Fate to be true through figurative language and incidents, in his book Romeo and Juliet. This story is about two families, very similar to one another, but yet different, for sadly, a family feud keeps them apart. The son and daughter of each family fall in love and due to all the pressures they feel from their family and others, they die, side by side in their unfortunate love.

Figurative language; although most do not take the subtle hints, many are indeed scoured all through out the book—clues about Fate being real. One of which are found in Act1.Scence4.Line113, “ ‘I fear too early, for my mind misgives some consequence yet hanging in the stars, shall bitterly begin his fearful date with this nights revels…By some vile forfeit of untimely death.’ ” This is Romeo, son of the Montague family. He is saying this just before he meets Juliet, daughter of the opposing House. He says solemnly that he feels that something tonight will happen here—at the Capulet’s party—where it will change his life forever, and lead to his death. Romeo ended it with saying; he felt it in the stars. Now, there is one peculiar thing leading up to this meeting between the two families. And that is how Romeo even got to know of—his supposedly hated people—Capulet’s party. A servingman, with the list of people to attend asks Romeo to read it for him, due to this strange coincidence that he, bearing the invitations, cannot read. Now pray tell, is this not, but the Fates doing? Stars, is the hidden key meaning; it is the disguise of the Fates. Although not seen or spoken out loud, Shakespeare has ‘stars’—a...
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