Rome and Han Empires

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Rome and Han Empires

By | March 2013
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From about 30 B.C.E to the 200’s A.C.E the Roman and the Han Empire’s fell. The Roman Empire had 2 centuries of Pax Romana (Peace in Rome) that ended with the death of Marcus Aurelius and started the decline and fall of the empire. In the Han Empire Liu Bang ruled the Empire very peacefully and restores unity to China, Bang established a centralized government, lowered taxes and softened punishments. Following Bang’s death Wudi ruled the Han empire and was known as the Martial Emperor because he wanted to expand China through wars, both Wudi and Bang were very successful leaders but after the death of Wudi china experienced many bad rulers and thus starting the fall of the Han Empire. Internal and external factors led to the decline and fall of classical empires like the Romans and the Han.

The fall of Rome was caused by many different internal and external reasons. One internal reason the Roman Empire fell was because of the weakening economy and inflation. In the text it says “Desperate for revenue, the government raised taxes, It also started minting coins that contained less and less silver.” By doing this the government made a huge mistake. Raising taxes made the civilians angry that they had to pay more, and minting coins with less silver caused inflation because they didn’t have enough metal to back it. This caused Rome to fall because the gap between the rich and poor grew even larger because of these mistakes. An external reason that Rome fell is that The Huns lead by Attilla started to attack the Empire. In the book it states“With 100,000 soldiers, Atilla terrorized both halves of the Empire. In the East, his armies attacked and plundered 70 cities.” The Huns along with the Germanic invasions hurt the Empire very badly and was one of the main factors it fell. These internal and external factors are why The Roman Empire fell the way it did.

The reason the Han empire fell was because of the internal and external factors. A main internal factor that...