Roman Technology

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ROMAN TECHNOLOGY
MARK NICHOLS
HISTORY 103 WORLD CIVILIZATIONS
PROF. PETER TSAHLRIDIS
November 22, 2012

The ancient Romans were very innovative in their technology they were in some ways way ahead of their time. Caesar built a bridge to cross the Rhine; this river was 25-30 feet deep and 1000 feet across. The really special part of this is that he ordered it done and the project was completed in just ten days. That is nearly impossible even with the advances in technology that we have made since then. Through his ingenious leadership the local timber was transformed into a bridge that would hold 40,000 soldiers and was able to withstand the river`s strong currents. The foundation was built using wooden pilings driven at angles deep into the river bed to give the bridge better stability. Then huge planks were laid across the top so that their chariots could be driven across. The design of this bridge was innovative but the most special part is the speed with which it was built. Engineering ideas were often borrowed from neighbors such as the “Etruscans”. The Etruscan`s knowledge was responsible for the underground sewer systems that allowed the water to drain from the roman streets into the Tiber river. This underground sewer system was known as the “Cloaca Maxima”. Pantheon: Roman engineering marvel Casseel,C.(writer and director) (2005) Another piece of ingenious technology that struck my interest was the use of a tool called a “Groma”. This tool was a surveying instrument to build Roman highways. The Romans built a highway strait down the coast to allow better access to an ever growing empire. These Roman highways were a work of art in their own right. They started as deep trenches and then filled with gravel and huge boulders to build a solid foundation. Then compacted clay was placed over the foundation finally followed by huge paving stones. The difference between Roman highways and today’s highways is that Roman highways were perfectly strait, because...
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