Role of Mother-in-Law During Intra-Conceptional Care of Their Daughter-in-Law in Rural Community of Munshigonj

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 31
  • Published : April 1, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Role of Mother-in-Law During Intra-Conceptional Care of their Daughter-in-Law In Rural Community of Munshigonj

DR. MOHAMMAD KABIR UDDIN
MPH: 11-94477-1

Submitter to:
Dr. Md. Nazrul Islam, Ph.D

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH
AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY, BANGLADESH (AIUB)
DHAKA, BANGLADESH.
APRIL, 2011
Table of Content
Chapter 1
1. Introduction

2. Background

3. Justification of the study

4. Research Question

5. Research Objective

1. General Objective

2. Specific Objective(s)

6. Listing of Variables

7. Conceptual Framework

Chapter 2
2.1 Literature Review
Chapter 3
3.1 Research Design
3.2 Study Period
3.3 Study Place
3.4 Study Population
3.5 Calculation of sample size
3.6 Sampling Technique
3.7 Eligibility Criteria
3.7.1 Inclusion Criteria
3.7.2 Exclusion Criteria
3.8 Development of Research Instruments
3.9 Plan for Data Collection
3.10 Plan for Data Analysis
3.11 Data presentation
3.12 Study Limitation

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION

1. Introduction:

Intra-conceptional period is the most important period of a women’s life. It includes the period from cessation of menstruation till forty two days of delivery. It is one of the most memorable and amusing period to a woman and her family. However, at the same time, it carries a lot of risk and danger to her life because of lack of knowledge about health, poverty, illiteracy, lack of health services and many more. According to recent statistics, the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) is 3.2 per 1000 live births and the infant mortality rate (IMR) is 41.26 per 1000 live births in Bangladesh. The crude birth rate is 20.54 per 1000 population and the crude death rate (CDR) is 6.02 per 1000 population. The total fertility rate (TFR) is 2.40 per woman of 15-49 years and life expectancy for male is 65.61 and life expectancy for female is 67.96, the overall literacy rate is 56.3. (DGHS 2011)

In spite of the fact that maternal mortality has declined from nearly 574 per 100,000 live births in the 1990 to between 320 and 400 in 20013, the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) in Bangladesh remains one of the highest in the world. It is estimated that 14% of maternal deaths are caused by violence against women, while 12,000 to 15,000 women die every year from maternal health complications. Some 45 percent of all mothers are malnourished.

The population of Bangladesh is relatively young, with a third falling within the age group of 10-24 years. Nearly half the adolescent girls (15-19 years) are married, 57 percent of them become mothers before the age of 19, and half these adolescent mothers are acutely malnourished. Thus MMR among adolescent mothers is 30-50 percent higher than the national rate.

The chief causes of maternal deaths are haemorrhage, unsafe abortion, and the ‘three delays dynamics’. The first delay, arising mainly from poverty, is in seeking professional care; the second delay is logistical as most of the health centres and private clinics are located in district towns whereas 70 percent of the population are rural based; the third delay arises from the lack of adequate human recourses and trained personnel at the service centres.

To reduce child mortality rate to achieve (Reduce under-five mortality rates by two-thirds between 1990-2015) MDG 5, Bangladesh must reduce maternal mortality from 574 deaths per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 143 by 2015; increase the proportion of births attended by skilled health personnel to 50%, and reduce the Total Fertility Rate to 2.2 per woman by 20101. In addition, to achieve the target for ‘Reproductive Health (RH) Services for All’ is closely linked to maternal mortality and morbidity.

2. Background Information:

In 2000,...
tracking img