Robert Frost

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How Robert Frost’s Life Experiences Created His Individuality and Affected His Poems Robert Frost has been considered as the most widely known and the most appreciated American poet of the twentieth century since he was preeminent and talented. There is an old saying that “Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration.” In fact, innate gift was just a small section that led Frost as a successful and influential poet. People cannot imagine that how assiduous and diligent he worked, and how he has been through so many hardships to achieve his accomplishment eventually. He was not only a celebrated poet; meanwhile, he was people’s role model, student’s good teacher and helpful friend, also reader’s soul mate. Frost was born in San Francisco, California on March 26, 1874. He spent the first 12 years of his life there. Until his father, William Prescott Frost Jr., died of tuberculosis. Following his father’s passing, his mother brought the family to the town of Lawrence, Massachusetts in 1885; therefore he was so intimately associated with rural New England. One tends to forget that the first landscape printed on his imagination was both urban and California. He started to write poems when he was 16; and in 1894, at the age of 20, his first published poem appears in the Independent. In 1895, he married his wife Elinor Miriam White, which was his high school sweetheart, and they had six children afterward. In 1897 to 1899, he attended Harvard College as a special student but never gained a formal degree. Since he worked so hard so his great effort obtained recognition eventually; for instance, he received a Pulitzer Prize for “New Hamphire” in 1924, his third Pulitzer Prize for “A Further Range” in 1937, and his fourth Pulitzer Prize for “A Witness Tree” in 1943. Furthermore, Durham University awards him the Doctor of Letters and he served as Delegate to World Congress of Writers in Sao Paulo, Brazil in 1952; then he went to England in 1957 because Oxford and Cambridge Universities and National University of Ireland awarded him the Doctor of Letters. In 1961, he was invited to read at the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy; he read “The Gift Outright.” In 1963, he was awarded the Bollinger Prize for Poetry and in the same year, he died in Boston at age eighty-eight (Gerber 15-8). In this research paper, the goal is to explore how Frost’s life experiences created his individuality and affected his poems individuality. This paper will focus on three of his poems: “The Mending Wall,” “The Wood Pile,” and “Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening” to prove some of theses. Undoubtedly, most of the time, poets’ own life experiences can provide them ideas or inspiration to do their works. Therefore, between the words and the lines, readers can always able to discover some profound meanings or the writer’s predicament. In fact, Frost’s simple and unadorned poem style was observable in poem after poem and his keen and sensitive sense of perception did stirs up reader’s heart. First of all, Frost was a sensitive and thoughtful poet. He is intuitive and is able to sense what others' thoughts and feelings are, even before they say anything to him. Robert often formed an opinion about a person or situation without much factual knowledge of them, and his impressions are usually correct. Frost came from an unstable childhood. When he was young, he never have felt that he had firm ground beneath his feet since his childhood or his relationships with his parents was unsettling in some way such as removal (Frost 34). Those abrupt changes in location or in family relationships have made him feel insecure; but because of that, he was given more freedom and less pressure to led him to be more of an individual and less tethered to restrictive ideas of how he should behave, feel, or even live (Parini 137). As compassionate and extremely...
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